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Happy Valentines Day 2015 Images - YouTube

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Pictures Of Valentine Day Images - YouTube

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Happy Valentines Day Greetings | Images | Videos.

Happy Valentines Day Greetings | Images | Videos.

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Butterflies - Simons Cat (A Valentines Special.
Butterflies - Simons Cat (A Valentines Special.

Butterflies - Simons Cat (A Valentines Special.

A lovestruck cat has a bad case of the butterflies Have you seen our Happy Valentines.

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Valentine Day images - YouTube

Valentine Day images - YouTube

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How Awkward Valentines Day Is For Bears - YouTube
How Awkward Valentines Day Is For Bears - YouTube

How Awkward Valentines Day Is For Bears - YouTube

Spare a thought for the bears this year. Happy V day. Hope you end up like me- crying at.

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Happy Valentine Day 2015 Shayari, SMS, Images.

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Tiny Hamsters Tiny Date (Ep. 5) - YouTube
Tiny Hamsters Tiny Date (Ep. 5) - YouTube

Tiny Hamsters Tiny Date (Ep. 5) - YouTube

Check out the Tiny Hamster Valentines Cards!: http://imgur.com/a/tWOou#0. Have a Happy.

Valentines Day Google Doodle - YouTube
Valentines Day Google Doodle - YouTube

Valentines Day Google Doodle - YouTube

Cold, Cold Heart performed by Tony Bennett. Courtesy of Columbia Records and Sony/ATV.

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Happy Valentines Day 2015

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Happy Valentines Day Display Pictures DPs 2015 for Whatsapp.

Happy Valentines Day Display Pictures DPs 2015 for Whatsapp.

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Valentines Day Display

Happy Valentines Day! Original hearts image by @cassiab for @frankiemagazine. Hand lettering by me. #lettering #handdrawntype #handlettering #magazine #font #typography
Happy Valentines Day! Original hearts image by @cassiab for @frankiemagazine. Hand lettering by me. #lettering #handdrawntype #handlettering #magazine #font #typography

Happy Valentines Day! Original hearts image by @cassiab for @frankiemagazine. Hand lettering by me. #lettering #handdrawntype #handlettering #magazine #font #typography

Happy Valentines Day! Original hearts image by @cassiab for @frankiemagazine. Hand lettering by me. #lettering #handdrawntype #handlettering #magazine #font #typography

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Polaris star trail pseudo-coloured
Polaris star trail pseudo-coloured

Polaris star trail pseudo-coloured

Polaris star trail pseudo-coloured

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Romantic Happy Valentines Day {FB} Facebook Photos Images Timeline.

Romantic Happy Valentines Day {FB} Facebook Photos Images Timeline.

Romantic Happy Valentines Day {FB} Facebook Photos Images Timeline.

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Happy Valentines Day 2015 Wallpapers, Pics, Cards, Photos | Happy.
Happy Valentines Day 2015 Wallpapers, Pics, Cards, Photos | Happy.

Happy Valentines Day 2015 Wallpapers, Pics, Cards, Photos | Happy.

Happy Valentines Day 2015 Wallpapers, Pics, Cards, Photos | Happy.

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Happy Valentines Day
Happy Valentines Day

Happy Valentines Day

Happy Valentines Day

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Happy Valentines Day 2015 Greeting Red Rose Images Free Download.

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Happy Valentines Day: My cup runneth over by Ed Ames | Opinion.
Happy Valentines Day: My cup runneth over by Ed Ames | Opinion.

Happy Valentines Day: My cup runneth over by Ed Ames | Opinion.

Happy Valentines Day: My cup runneth over by Ed Ames | Opinion.

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Silk Road
Silk Road
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happy valentines day images | Pictures and Quotes

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My Valentine
My Valentine
Thank you
Thank you
Hearts of Valentines Day
Hearts of Valentines Day

Hearts of Valentines Day

Hearts of Valentines Day

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HAPPY VALENTINES DAY IMAGES HD 2015
HAPPY VALENTINES DAY IMAGES HD 2015

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY IMAGES HD 2015

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY IMAGES HD 2015

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Happy Valentines Day Logo
Happy Valentines Day Logo

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Happy Valentines Day Logo

Polaris star trail
Polaris star trail

Polaris star trail

Polaris star trail

Courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/people/7773270@N02/

Little Blue Box
Little Blue Box
Happy Feb 14th! Heres an image of a place we love, from a talk that we loved, that serves beer that we love.in a city that we love. #hopleaf #chicagobeer #beerbar #andersonville #chicago #beerporn (photo by our talented photographer @melindajanemyersph
Happy Feb 14th! Heres an image of a place we love, from a talk that we loved, that serves beer that we love.in a city that we love. #hopleaf #chicagobeer #beerbar #andersonville #chicago #beerporn (photo by our talented photographer @melindajanemyersph

Happy Feb 14th! Heres an image of a place we love, from a talk that we loved, that serves beer that we love.in a city that we love. #hopleaf #chicagobeer #beerbar #andersonville #chicago #beerporn (photo by our talented photographer @melindajanemyersph

Happy Feb 14th! Heres an image of a place we love, from a talk that we loved, that serves beer that we love.in a city that we love. #hopleaf #chicagobeer #beerbar #andersonville #chicago #beerporn (photo by our talented photographer @melindajanemyersph

Courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/people/123648498@N05/

I Love You Valentines Day Picture | HAPPY VALENTINES DAY IMAGES
I Love You Valentines Day Picture | HAPPY VALENTINES DAY IMAGES

I Love You Valentines Day Picture | HAPPY VALENTINES DAY IMAGES

I Love You Valentines Day Picture | HAPPY VALENTINES DAY IMAGES

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Hummingbird Moth -Textured
Hummingbird Moth -Textured

Hummingbird Moth -Textured

Hummingbird Moth -Textured

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Your Packages Are Happy To See You
Your Packages Are Happy To See You

Your Packages Are Happy To See You

Your Packages Are Happy To See You

Courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/people/113181945@N04/

There are lives I can imagine without children but none of them have the same laughter & noise.
There are lives I can imagine without children but none of them have the same laughter & noise.

There are lives I can imagine without children but none of them have the same laughter & noise.

There are lives I can imagine without children but none of them have the same laughter & noise.

Courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/people/45436471@N08/

Hearts On The Rim
Hearts On The Rim

Hearts On The Rim

Hearts On The Rim

Courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/people/99871760@N00/

Happy Valentines Day Cards, Heart Greeting Wishes
Happy Valentines Day Cards, Heart Greeting Wishes

Happy Valentines Day Cards, Heart Greeting Wishes

Happy Valentines Day Cards, Heart Greeting Wishes

Happy Valentines Day 2015

Happy Valentines Day Cards, Heart Greeting Wishes
Happy Valentines Day Cards, Heart Greeting Wishes

Happy Valentines Day Cards, Heart Greeting Wishes

Happy Valentines Day Cards, Heart Greeting Wishes

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Happy Valentines Day Quotes: Funny, Sweet, And Romantic Sayings To Share.

For those who are madly in love, writing a romantic quote on the back of a special photo or inside a card is not only thoughtful, it lasts longer than a bouquet of flowers. In the beginning stages of dating? Try a funny or light-hearted quote so you.

Homes for Valentines Day ��� in pictures - The Guardian

From Cornwall to Normandy, here are some homes to appeal to the romantic in you.

GuardianWitness: Climate change on Valentines Day ��� in.

GuardianWitness: Climate change on Valentines Day ��� in pictures. We asked readers to share the things they treasured that could be affected by climate change or something they love that may be lost forever. You can see all��.

21 Valentines Day Gift Ideas for All the People You Love.

Photo: Getty Images. The most lovey-dovey day of the year is just around the corner, possibly evoking dread in many boyfriends, husbands, and singletons. But Valentines Day isnt just for couples, its about showing love and��.

23 Valentines Day Stock Photos That Will Make You Glad Youre So Utterly Single

This Singles Awareness Day, remember that love isnt all that its cracked up to be. Nowhere is that more obvious than in the goofy world of stock photography, where stupid cupids, awkward couples and amusing salads intersect in a train wreck of bad .

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Happy Valentines Day Images, Pictures for you all to share on Facebook and WhatsApp. Today is 14th February, a day better known as the day of love or the Valentines Day. In this date we celebrate the beauty of love, togetherness, warmth in.

Photos of Victorias Secret Models In Lingerie [SLIDESHOW.

Its Valentines Day, and, honestly, what better Valentine could you have than a Victorias Secret model? They dont eat chocolates, and you dont have to buy them lingerie because they wear it for a living. These models are��.

Happy Valentines Day 2015 Wishes SMS, Messages, Quotes

Valentines Day, also known as Valentines Day or The Feast of Saint Valentine, Valentines Day Wishes Quotes, SMS, Messages, Images and Pictures.

The Listings: Nov. 18 -- Nov. 24

Selective listings by critics of The New York Times of new and noteworthy cultural events in the New York metropolitan region this week. * denotes a highly recommended film, concert, show or exhibition. Theater Approximate running times are in parentheses. Theaters are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of current shows, additional listings, showtimes and tickets: nytimes.com/theater. Previews and Openings THE GENTLEMAN DANCING-MASTER Opens Sunday. William Wycherleys Restoration satire receives a rare production, courtesy of the Pearl Theater Company (2:20). Pearl Theater, 80 St. Marks Place, East Village, (212) 598-9802. MR. MARMALADE Opens Sunday. See the world through the eyes of precocious children in Noah Haidles comedy about a wished-for family (1:50). Roundabout Theater Company, Laura Pels Theater, at the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theater, 111 West 46th Street, (212) 719-1300. SEASCAPE Opens Monday. George Grizzard, Frances Sternhagen, Elizabeth Marvel and Frederick Weller star in this revival of Edward Albees interspecies drama about a couple who meet two talking lizards on the beach (1:45). Lincoln Center Theater, at the Booth Theater, 222 West 45th Street, (212) 239-6200. ABIGAILS PARTY Opens Dec. 1. The New Groups production of Mike Leighs comedy about a dinner party gone horribly wrong stars Jennifer Jason Leigh (2:15). Acorn Theater at Theater Row, 410 West 42nd Street, Clinton, (212) 279-4200. CHITA RIVERA: THE DANCERS LIFE Previews start Wednesday. Opens Dec. 11. The star of Chicago and West Side Story relives many of her (and Broadways) greatest moments, with the help of a book by Terrence McNally (2:00). Schoenfeld Theater, 236 West 45th Street, (212) 239-6200. CELEBRATION and THE ROOM Previews start Wednesday. Opens Dec. 5. Two short plays from opposite ends of Harold Pinters distinguished career (1:45). Atlantic Theater, 336 West 20th Street, Chelsea, (212) 239-6200. THE COLOR PURPLE Opens Dec. 1. Alice Walkers Pulitzer Prizewinning book has become the basis for the first musical co-produced by Oprah Winfrey (2:30). Broadway Theater, 1681 Broadway, at 53rd Street, (212) 239-6200. MISS WITHERSPOON Opens Nov. 29. Veronica commits suicide and refuses to be reincarnated in Christopher Durangs new comedy (1:20). Playwrights Horizons, 416 West 42nd Street, Clinton, (212) 279-4200. THE OTHER SIDE Opens Dec. 6. A new work by Ariel Dorfman (Death and the Maiden) about a couple living in a war-torn country waiting for their 15-year-old son to return home. Rosemary Harris and John Cullum star (2:00). Manhattan Theater Club, City Center Stage I, 131 West 55th Street, (212) 581-1212. ROPE Previews start Monday. Opens Dec. 4. The Drama Dept. and the Zipper Theater present a revival of Patrick Hamiltons drama inspired by the Leopold and Loeb murder case. David Warren directs (2:05). The Zipper Theater, 336 West 37th Street, (212) 239-6200. TIGHT EMBRACE Previews start Tuesday. Opens Dec. 6. Two kidnapped women struggle to survive in this new play about political violence by Jorge Ignacio Cortinas (2:00). Intar Theater at the Kirk on Theater Row, 410 West 42nd Street, Clinton, (212) 279-4200. A TOUCH OF THE POET Opens Dec. 8. Gabriel Byrne, last on Broadway in A Moon for the Misbegotten, stars as an Irish tavern owner whose daughter falls in love with a wealthy American in one of Eugene ONeills last plays. Doug Hughes directs (2:30). Studio 54, 254 West 54th Street, (212) 719-1300. THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL Opens Dec. 4. A revival of Horton Footes drama about a woman longing to return to her childhood home. Directed by the veteran actor Harris Yulin (2:15). Signature Theater, 555 West 42nd Street, Clinton, (212) 244-7529. Broadway ABSURD PERSON SINGULAR An uninspired revival of Alan Ayckbourns classic farce of marital misery and Christmas cheerlessness, directed by John Tillinger. The largely merely serviceable cast includes Paxton Whithead, Mireille Enos and the wonderful Deborah Rush, who sidesteps the usual clichĂ©s of playing drunk in splendid comic style (2:30). Biltmore Theater, 261 West 47th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Ben Brantley). CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG The playthings are the thing in this lavish windup music box of a show: windmills, Rube Goldberg-esque machines and the shows title character, a flying car. Its like spending two and a half hours in the Times Square branch of Toys R Us (2:30). Hilton Theater, 213 West 42nd Street, (212) 307-4100. (Brantley) DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS On paper this musical tale of two mismatched scam artists has an awful lot in common with The Producers. But if you are going to court comparison with giants, you had better be prepared to stand tall. Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, starring John Lithgow and Norbert Leo Butz, never straightens out of a slouch (2:35). Imperial Theater, 249 West 45th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) * DOUBT, A PARABLE (Pulitzer Prize, Best Play 2005, and Tony Award, Best Play 2005) Set in the Bronx in 1964, this play by John Patrick Shanley is structured as a clash of wills and generations between Sister Aloysius (Cherry Jones), the head of a parochial school, and Father Flynn (Brian F. OByrne), the young priest who may or may not be too fond of the boys in his charge. The plays elements bring to mind those tidy topical melodramas that were once so popular. But Mr. Shanley makes subversive use of musty conventions (1:30). Walter Kerr, 219 West 48th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) IN MY LIFE Joseph Brookss whimsical musical about heaven and earth works grotesquely hard to disguise its conventional heart. Mostly, its like drowning in a singing sea of syrup (1:45). Music Box Theater, 239 West 45th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) JERSEY BOYS From grit to glamour with the Four Seasons, directed by the pop repackager Des McAnuff (The Whos Tommy). The real thrill of this shrink-wrapped bio-musical, for those who want something more than recycled chart toppers and a storyline poured from a can, is watching the wonderful John Lloyd Young (as Frankie Valli) cross the line from exact impersonation into something far more compelling (2:30). The August Wilson Theater, 245 West 52nd Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) LATINOLOGUES Created and written by Rick Najera and directed by Cheech Marin, long since de-Chonged, this is a series of loosely linked monologues delivered in character by Mr. Najera and three other talented Latino performers. Mr. Najera and his compadres can be skillful slingers of one-liners, but the characters cooked up to transmit them are neither fresh nor fully realized. In contrast to the colorfully individualized portraits in John Leguizamos solo shows, the men and women of Latinologues are composites of worn, easy stereotypes (1:30). Helen Hayes Theater, 240 West 44th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Charles Isherwood) THE LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA Love is a many-flavored thing, from sugary to sour, in Adam Guettel and Craig Lucass encouragingly ambitious and discouragingly unfulfilled new musical. The show soars only in the sweetly bitter songs performed by the wonderful Victoria Clark, as an American abroad (2:15). Beaumont Theater, Lincoln Center, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) A NAKED GIRL ON THE APPIAN WAY Could it be that the exhaustingly prolific Richard Greenberg has been even busier than anyone suspected? This clunky farce about the limits of liberalism, directed by Doug Hughes and starring a miscast Richard Thomas and Jill Clayburgh, suggests that Mr. Greenberg has been moonlighting as a gag writer for sitcoms and is now recycling his discarded one-liners (1:45). American Airlines Theater, 227 West 42nd Street, (212) 719-1300. (Brantley) THE ODD COUPLE Odd is not the word for this couple. How could an adjective suggesting strangeness or surprise apply to a production so calculatedly devoted to the known, the cozy, the conventional? As the title characters in Neil Simons 1965 comedy, directed as if to a metronome by Joe Mantello, Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick reprise their star performances from The Producers, and its not a natural fit. Dont even consider killing yourself because the show is already sold out (2:10). Brooks Atkinson Theater, 256 West 47th Street, (212) 307-4100. (Brantley). SPAMALOT (Tony Award, Best Musical 2005) This staged re-creation of the mock-medieval movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail is basically a singing scrapbook for Python fans. Such a good time is being had by so many people that this fitful, eager celebration of inanity and irreverence has found a large and lucrative audience (2:20). Shubert Theater, 225 West 44th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) * SWEENEY TODD Sweet dreams, New York. This thrilling new revival of Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheelers musical, with Michael Cerveris and Patti LuPone leading a cast of 10 who double as their own musicians, burrows into your thoughts like a campfire storyteller who knows what really scares you. The inventive director John Doyle aims his pared-down interpretation at the squirming child in everyone, who wants to have his worst fears both confirmed and dispelled (2:30). Eugene ONeill Theater, 230 West 49th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) SWEET CHARITY This revival of the 1966 musical never achieves more than a low-grade fever when whats wanted is that old steam heat. In the title role of the hopeful dance-hall hostess, the appealing but underequipped Christina Applegate is less a shopworn angel than a merry cherub (2:30). Al Hirschfeld Theater, 302 West 45th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) SOUVENIR Stephen Temperleys sweet, long love letter of a play celebrates the unlikely career of Florence Foster Jenkins, a notoriously tone-deaf soprano socialite. Its a show that could easily have been pure camp and at over two hours, it still wears thin. But with Vivian Matalon directing the redoubtable Judy Kaye as Mrs. Jenkins, and Donald Corren as her accompanist, the plays investigative empathy turns the first act into unexpectedly gentle, affecting comedy (2:15). Lyceum Theater, 149 West 45th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) * THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE The happy news for this happy-making little musical is that the move to larger quarters has dissipated none of its quirky charm. William Finns score sounds plumper and more rewarding than it did Off Broadway, providing a sprinkling of sugar to complement the sass in Rachel Sheinkins zinger-filled book. The performances are flawless. Gold stars all around. (1:45). Circle in the Square, 1633 Broadway, at 50th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Isherwood) Off Broadway ALMOST HEAVEN: SONGS OF JOHN DENVER Almost 30 of John Denvers songs are rediscovered and reinvented, as the shows publicity material says, but not generally improved upon. But Nicholas Rodriguez hits the high notes of Calypso spectacularly (2:00). Promenade Theater, 2162 Broadway, at 76th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Neil Genzlinger) * ALTAR BOYZ This sweetly satirical show about a Christian pop group made up of five potential Teen People cover boys is an enjoyable, silly diversion (1:30). Dodger Stages, Stage 4, 340 West 50th Street, Clinton, (212) 239-6200.(Isherwood) BACH AT LEIPZIG Itamar Mosess comedy is an ardent but hollow literary homage to Tom Stoppard stuffed with arcana about religious and musical squabbles in 18th-century Germany and knowingly feeble jokes. Despite the nimble gifts of a first-rate cast, the play never works up the farcical energy to lift us over the puddles of book-learning (2:15). New York Theater Workshop, 79 East Fourth Street, East Village, (212) 239-6200. (Isherwood) BEOWULF Bob Flanagans luminous puppets of lizards and fish are wonderful, but they are relatively tangential to a so-called rock opera that is not sure whether it wants to be a childrens show or Jesus Christ Superstar, and fails at both. Humans who are less animate than the puppets try to sing their way through an uninspired enactment of this great epic (1:15). Irish Repertory Theater, 132 West 22nd Street, Chelsea, (212) 727-2737. (Anne Midgette) BINGO Play bingo, munch on popcorn and watch accomplished actors freshen up a stale musical about game night (1:20). St. Lukes Theater, 308 West 46th Street, Clinton, (212) 239-6200.(Jason Zinoman) DRUMSTRUCK This noisy novelty is a mixed blessing. Providing a two-foot drum on every seat, it offers an opportunity to exorcise aggressions by delivering a good beating, and, on a slightly more elevated level, it presents a superficial introduction to African culture, lessons in drumming and 90 minutes of nonstop music, song and dancing by a good-natured cast (1:30). Dodger Stages, Stage 2, 340 West 50th Street, Clinton, (212) 239-6200. (Lawrence Van Gelder) FIVE COURSE LOVE This musical is merely pleasantly fluffy, and sometimes offensive, but Heather Ayers may make a star vehicle out of it, thanks to an energetic, versatile performance in five roles. She, John Bolton and Jeff Gurner search for love in five restaurants, with a too-generous portion of bad accents and phallic jokes along the way (1:30). Minetta Lane Theater, 18 Minetta Lane, Greenwich Village, (212) 307-4100.( Genzlinger) * FORBIDDEN BROADWAY: SPECIAL VICTIMS UNIT This production features the expected caricatures of ego-driven singing stars. But even more than usual, the show offers an acute list of grievances about the sickly state of the Broadway musical, where, as the lyrics have it, everything old is old again (1:45). 47th Street Theater, 304 West 47th Street, Clinton, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL A terrific cast keeps the generator running in this bright but flimsy contraption. A few of David Nehlss dozen ditties raise a hearty chuckle, like the valedictory anthem in which the shows heroines collectively vow to make like a nail and press on. But Betsy Kelsos book all but dispenses with plot, and substitutes crude cartoons for characters (2:00). Dodger Stages, 340 West 50th Street, Clinton, (212) 239-6200. (Isherwood) HAMLET Michael Cumpsty gives a forceful, intelligent reading of the title role in the Classic Stage Companys likably intimate production of Shakespeares tale of doom-struck Danes. Brian Kulicks production is heavy on the directorial gimmickry (smell the spray paint! watch the set be shredded!), leaving psychology and philosophy to fend for themselves (2:30). Classic Stage Company, 136 East 13th Street, East Village, (212) 279-4200. (Isherwood) HILDA Marie Ndiayes play is a psychodrama from which most of the psychology seems to have mysteriously evaporated, taking a lot of the drama with it. Ellen Karas stars as a bourgeois housewife whose obsession with her maid eventually unhinges her (1:20). Part of the Act French Festival. 59E59 Theaters, 59 East 59th Street, (212) 279-4200. (Isherwood) IN THE AIR Historical melodrama about the 1918 flu epidemic is like a soft-focus film on the Lifetime channel (2:15). Theater 315, 315 West 47th Street, Clinton, (212) 868-4444. (Zinoman) INFERTILITY A harmless, insubstantial and highly amplified musical about the struggles of five people hoping to become parents (1:20). Dillons, 245 West 54th Street, (212) 868-4444. (Zinoman) JUNIE B. JONES A spirited entertainment (1:30). Theaterworks/NYC, at the Lucille Lortel Theater, 121 Christopher Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 279-4200. (Van Gelder) MARION BRIDGE The Canadian playwright Daniel MacIvor takes a quiet, honest look at three sisters as they face their mothers death. It is well acted and well directed, if too predictable in spots (2:20). Urban Stages, 259 West 30th Street, (212) 868-4444. (Margo Jefferson) MEDEA The Jean Cocteau Repertorys clichĂ©-ridden modern translation strains to be relevant (1:30). Bouwerie Lane Theater, 330 Bowery, near East Second Street, East Village, (212) 279-4200. (Zinoman) ONE-MAN STAR WARS TRILOGY With a storm trooper roaming the aisles and a woman in an Obi-Wan Kenobi get-up telling theatergoers to turn off their cellphones or they will be turned into cosmic dust, Charles Rosss sprint through Episodes IV through VI strives for the atmosphere of a Star Wars convention, but ends up achieving something like a religious revival (which is sort of the same thing). True believers will love how Mr. Ross, a self-confessed geek who plays every major role in under an hour, simulates R2D2, but everyone else will scratch their heads (1:00). Lambs Theater, 130 West 44th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Zinoman) ON SECOND AVENUE This genial show by the Folksbiene Yiddish Theater, celebrating Second Avenues theatrical heyday, somehow manages to be both a perfect ensemble production and a star vehicle for Mike Burstyn. The production, first seen last March and April, is in its second go-round (2:00). J.C.C. in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue, at 76th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Genzlinger) * ORSONS SHADOW Austin Pendletons play, about a 1960 production of Ionescos Rhinoceros, which was directed by Orson Welles and starred Laurence Olivier, is a sharp-witted but tenderhearted backstage comedy about the thin skins, inflamed nerves and rampaging egos that are the customary side effects when sensitivity meets success (2:00). Barrow Street Theater, 27 Barrow Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 239-6200. (Isherwood) Radio City Christmas Spectacular Diminished though it may be by the absence of its orchestra in its 73rd season, it remains prime entertainment (1:30). 50th Street and Avenue of the Americas, (212) 307-1000. (Van Gelder) RFK This solo show written and starring Jack Holmes is a reasonably accurate historical portrait, but the performance, unfortunately, lacks the charisma and charm that made the real Bobby Kennedy a star (1:35). Culture Project, 45 Bleecker Street, at Lafayette Street, East Village, (212) 253-9983. (Jonathan Kalb) SEE WHAT I WANNA TO SEE A hot-and-cold chamber musical by Michael John LaChiusa, based on stories by Ryuonsoke Akutagawa, that considers the nature of truth and belief. The shows film-noir-style first half is more chilly than chilling. But its second act, set in the shadow of 9/11, throbs affectingly with a hunger for faith. With Idina Menzel and Marc Kudisch (2:00). The Public Theater, 425 Lafayette Street, at Astor Place, East Village, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) * A SOLDIERS PLAY This movingly acted revival of Charles Fullers Pulitzer Prizewinning drama from 1981, directed by Jo Bonney and featuring Taye Diggs, uses the clean-lined conventions of murder mysteries to elicit unsettlingly blurred shades of racism, resentment and self-hatred (1:55). Second Stage Theater, 307 West 43rd Street, Clinton, (212) 246-4422. (Brantley) THIRD Heidi is having hot flashes. In this thoughtful, seriously imbalanced comedy, Wendy Wasserstein takes her archetypal heroine (most famously embodied in 1988 in The Heidi Chronicles) into the fog of menopausal, existential uncertainty. The wonderful but miscast Dianne Weist plays a feminist college professor forced to reconsider everything she stands for. Though Daniel Sullivans staging is too easygoing to build tension, the play exhales a poignant air of autumnal rue (2:00). Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater, 150 West 65th Street, Lincoln Center, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) Off Off Broadway BELLY OF A DRUNKEN PIANO In this splendidly imperfect cabaret, Stewart DArrietta howls and growls convincingly through Tom Waitss three-decade song catalog, backed by a snappy trio. His patter and his piano playing are variable, but Mr. DArrietta makes a genial tour guide through Mr. Waitss wee-hours world (1:45). Huron Club at SoHo Playhouse, 15 Vandam Street, between Avenue of the Americas and Varick Street, (212) 691-1555. (Rob Kendt) BARTLEBY, THE SCRIVENER Herman Melvilles exquisitely existential short story has been beautifully brought to life at the Blue Heron Theater. From the set, which looks like a Victorian illustration, complete with desks with inkpots and plumes, to the characters dressed in antic black-and-white (reminiscent, say, of a Phiz drawing for a Dickens novel) (1:40). Blue Heron Arts Center, 123 East 24th Street, (212) 868-4444. (Phoebe Hoban) BIG APPLE CIRCUS -- GRANDMA GOES TO HOLLYWOOD Long on sweetness, rich in color and highly tuneful, but short on eye-popping, cheer-igniting wows (2:10). Damrosch Park at Lincoln Center, Broadway and 63rd Street, (212) 307-4100. (Van Gelder) COWBOY V. SAMURAI This adaptation of Cyrano de Bergerac is set in a small Western town, where an Asian-American English teacher and an Anglo-Saxon gym teacher with cowboy leanings vie for the love of a sophisticated woman (1:45) National Asian American Theater Company, at the Rattlestick theater, 224 Waverly Place, Greenwich Village, (212) 352-3101. (Jefferson). DOÑA ROSITA LA SOLTERA (DOÑA ROSITA THE SPINSTER) Watching Repertorio Españols Dona Rosita the Spinster is a bit like finding a dried flower pressed in a book: charming, archaic and just a bit musty, even though the lead is played by Denise Quiñones -- Miss Universe, 2001. Frederico GarcĂ­a Lorcas poetic play has a predictable premise; a beautiful young woman waits in vain for the handsome cousin she is engaged to. Luckily, the tragicomedy has some laughs (2:00). In Spanish with live simultaneous translation via headsets. Repertorio Español, at the Gramercy Arts Theater, 138 East 27th Street, (212) 225-9920. (Hoban) Long-Running Shows AVENUE Q R-rated puppets give lively life lessons (2:10). Golden, 252 West 45th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Cartoon made flesh, sort of (2:30). Lunt-Fontanne Theater, 205 West 46th Street, (212) 307-4747. (Brantley) CHICAGO Irrefutable proof that crime pays (2:25). Ambassador Theater, 219 West 49th Street, (212) 239-6200.(Brantley) FIDDLER ON THE ROOF The Shtetl Land pavilion in the theme park called Broadway. With Rosie ODonnell and Harvey Fierstein. (2:55). The Minskoff Theater, 200 West 45th Street, (212) 307-4100. (Brantley) HAIRSPRAY Fizzy pop, cute kids, large man in a housedress (2:30). Neil Simon Theater, 250 West 52nd Street, (212) 307-4100. (Brantley) THE LION KING Disney on safari, where the big bucks roam (2:45). New Amsterdam Theater, 214 West 42nd Street, (212) 307-4100. (Brantley) MAMMA MIA! The jukebox that devoured Broadway (2:20). Cadillac Winter Garden Theater, 1634 Broadway, at 50th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) MOVIN OUT The miracle dance musical that makes Billy Joel cool (2:00). Richard Rodgers Theater, 226 West 46th Street, (212) 307-4100. (Brantley) THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA Who was that masked man, anyway? (2:30). Majestic Theater, 247 West 44th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) THE PRODUCERS The ne plus ultra of showbiz scams (2:45). St. James Theater, 246 West 44th Street, (212) 239-6200. (Brantley) RENT East Village angst and love songs to die for (2:45). Nederlander Theater, 208 West 41st Street, (212) 307-4100. (Brantley) * SLAVAS SNOWSHOW Clowns chosen by the Russian master Slava Polunin are stirring up laughter and enjoyment. A show that touches the heart as well as tickles the funny bone (1:30). Union Square Theater, 100 East 17th Street, Flatiron district, (212) 307-4100.(Van Gelder) * THOM PAIN (BASED ON NOTHING) Is there such a thing as stand-up existentialism? If not, Will Eno has just invented it. Stand-up-style comic riffs and deadpan hipster banter keep interrupting the corrosively bleak narrative. Mr. Eno is a Samuel Beckett for the Jon Stewart generation (1:10). DR2 Theater, 103 East 15th Street, Flatiron district, (212) 239-6200. (Isherwood) WICKED Oz revisited, with political corrections (2:45). Gershwin Theater, 222 West 51st Street, (212) 307-4100. (Brantley) Last Chance CAMBODIA AGONISTES A musical about the Khmer Rouge? It works better than you might think in this revival of a 1992 play: Cambodias recent history is painted in broad strokes of parody intermingled with a tragic story line. But the most vivid performer on stage is a real-life Cambodian dancer, Sam-Ouen Tes, who doesnt have a speaking role but communicates more than this slightly pale though well-meaning piece (1:30). West End Theater, 263 West 86th Street, (212) 279-4200. Pan Asian Repertory Theater, at the West End Theater, in the Church of St. Paul and St. Andrew, 263 West 86th Street, (212) 279-4200, closing Sunday. ( Midgette) MANIC FLIGHT REACTION Sarah Schulmans intermittently zingy play is an awkward mixture of cultural satire and earnest psychodrama about love and responsibility. Deirdre OConnell gives a warm, engaging performance as a reformed rebel with a colorful past that bleeds into the present in sensational ways (2:00). Peter Jay Sharp Theater, Playwrights Horizons, 416 West 42nd Street, Clinton, (212) 279-4200, closing Sunday. (Isherwood) THE SALVAGE SHOP Jim Nolans moving, old fashioned drama, about a fraught father-and-son relationship in a small coastland town in Ireland, delivers an emotional punch (2:30). The Storm Theater, 145 West 46th Street, (212) 868-4444, closing tomorrow. (Zinoman) THE TAMING OF THE SHREW What could be more apt than the all-female Queens Company tackling Shakespeares Taming of the Shrew, perhaps the most famous war-of-the-sexes comedy ever? But just because Petruchio (and everyone else) is played by a woman doesnt mean that this is a feminist diatribe. In this not very tame production, Bianca is played by an inflatable doll (1:50). Queens Company, Walker Space, 46 Walker Street, between Broadway and Church Street, TriBeCa, (212) 868-4444, closing Sunday. (Hoban) Movies Ratings and running times are in parentheses; foreign films have English subtitles. Full reviews of all current releases, movie trailers, showtimes and tickets: nytimes.com/movies. * AFTER INNOCENCE (No rating, 95 minutes) Calm, deliberate and devastating, Jessica Sanderss documentary After Innocence examines the cases of seven men wrongly convicted of murder and rape and exonerated years later by DNA evidence. It confirms many of your worst fears about the weaknesses of the American criminal justice system. (Stephen Holden) * BEE SEASON (PG-13, 104 minutes) A genuinely felt, finely made adaptation of the Myla Goldberg novel about an 11-year-old girl with an ineffable gift for summoning up perfectly strung-together words. With Richard Gere, Juliette Binoche, Max Minghella and the wonderful newcomer Flora Cross as the family nearly undone by that gift. (Manohla Dargis) BROOKLYN LOBSTER (No rating, 90 minutes) Kitchen-sink neorealism set in Sheepshead Bay: although well acted by Danny Aiello and Jane Curtin, too much of the film plays like a tedious case history from a business school textbook. (Holden) CAPE OF GOOD HOPE (PG-13, 107 minutes) Set in gorgeous Cape Town, Mark Bamfords energizing first feature revolves around a group of animal-shelter workers and their significant counterparts, as they contend with varying states of loneliness and gaping voids in their lives. A genuinely uplifting, satisfying and memorable film. (Laura Kern) * CAPOTE (R, 114 minutes) Philip Seymour Hoffmans portrayal of Truman Capote is a tour de force of psychological insight. Following the novelist as he works on the magazine assignment that will become In Cold Blood, the film raises intriguing questions about the ethics of writing. (A. O. Scott) CHICKEN LITTLE (G, 80 minutes) The sky is falling! The sky is falling! Well, its not as bad as that. Almost, though. (Scott) DERAILED (R, 110 minutes) A glossy and often risible bit of trash about an adulterous affair gone bad, bad, bad, starring the invaluable Clive Owen and an uncomfortable-looking Jennifer Aniston. (Dargis) * THE DYING GAUL (R, 105 minutes) Craig Lucass screen adaptation of his bitter Off Broadway revenge tragedy, is a sublimely acted film and a high point in the careers of its three stars, Campbell Scott, Patricia Clarkson and Peter Sarsgaard, who play a bisexual Hollywood studio executive, his wife and a young screenwriter. (Holden) ELLIE PARKER (No rating, 95 minutes) This corrosive deadpan comedy, crudely filmed in digital video, follows the misadventures of an aspiring actress in Los Angeles. Naomi Watts, in the title role, delivers a small, brave, acting tour de force. (Holden) GAY SEX IN THE 70s (No rating, 72 minutes) Joseph Lovetts nostalgic paean to the erotic utopia of his youth might be more accurately titled Anonymous Gay Male Sex in the 70s in Manhattan. Within that narrow framework, the film is quite successful, using archival photographs, clips from pornographic films and television commercials, and interviews to evoke the period between June 1969, when the Stonewall riots brought homosexuality out of the shadows, to June 1981, when the AIDS epidemic began. (Dana Stevens) GET RICH OR DIE TRYIN (R, 134 minutes) This lumbering vehicle for the rap star 50 Cent blends gangster intrigue with follow-your-dream striving. The story is a mess, and the star is no actor, but a fine supporting cast and Jim Sheridans warm-hearted direction make it watchable. (Scott) * GOOD NIGHT, AND GOOD LUCK (PG, 90 minutes) George Clooney, with impressive rigor and intelligence, examines the confrontation between the CBS newsman Edward R. Murrow (a superb David Strathairn) and Senator Joseph R. McCarthy (himself). Plunging you into a smoky, black-and-white world of political paranoia and commercial pressure, the film is both a history lesson and a passionate essay on power, responsibility and the ethics of journalism (Scott) JARHEAD (R, 123 minutes) Sam Mendess film about marines waiting for action in the first gulf war is often vivid and profane, like the Anthony Swofford memoir on which it is based, and some of the performances crackle with energy. But the film as a whole feels strangely detached and -- even more strangely, given its topical resonance -- irrelevant. (Scott) KISS KISS, BANG BANG (R, 103 minutes) Clever and dumb at the same time, this hectic pastiche of Los Angeles. noir conventions offers opportunities for Robert Downey Jr., Val Kilmer and Michelle Monaghan to have a good time with hard-boiled dialogue, and the audience to have a few laughs watching them. The pictures self-conscious manipulations of tone and chronology might have seemed fresh and witty 10 years ago, but probably not even then. (Scott) THE LEGEND OF ZORRO (PG, 126 minutes) Like most sequels, this successor to The Mask of Zorro feels obliged to outperform its forerunner by being bigger, faster and more spectacular. That translates into busier, sloppier, less coherent and more frantic. (Holden) * NINE LIVES (R, 115 minutes) The director Rodrigo Garcias suite of fleeting but intense moments in the lives of nine women is an extraordinarily rich and satisfying film, the cinematic equivalent of a collection of Chekhov short stories. The brilliant cast includes Sissy Spacek, Robin Wright Penn, Holly Hunter and Amy Brenneman. (Holden) NORTH COUNTRY (R, 123 minutes) A wobbly fiction about a real pioneering sex-discrimination case, North Country is an unabashed vehicle for its modestly de-glammed star, Charlize Theron, but its also a star vehicle with heart -- an old-fashioned liberal weepie about truth and justice. (Dargis) * PARADISE NOW (PG-13, 90 minutes, in Arabic and Hebrew) This melodrama about two Palestinians, best friends from childhood, chosen to carry out a suicide bombing in Tel Aviv is a superior thriller whose shrewdly inserted plot twists and emotional wrinkles are calculated to put your heart in your throat and keep it there. (Holden) * PRIDE & PREJUDICE (PG, 128 minutes) In this sumptuous, extravagantly romantic adaptation of Jane Austens 1813 novel, Keira Knightleys Elizabeth Bennet exudes a radiance that suffuses the movie. This is a banquet of high-end comfort food perfectly cooked and seasoned to Anglophilic tastes. (Holden) PRIME (PG-13, 105 minutes) Actually, pretty mediocre. A thin romantic comedy that nonetheless has its charms, most of them provided by Uma Thurman as a divorced 37-year-old who falls for a 23-year-old who happens to be her therapists son. (Scott) SAW II (R, 91 minutes) Jigsaw, the sicko known for masterminding twisted life-or-death games, returns for a sequel that doesnt really compare to its fine predecessor, though it still manages to be eye-opening (and sometimes positively nauseating) in itself. (Kern) * SHOPGIRL (R, 107 minutes) This delicate, deceptively simple film, taken from Steve Martins novella, spins perfect romance out of loneliness, compromise and the possibility of heartbreak. As a young retail clerk adrift in Los Angeles, Claire Danes gives a flawless performance, and Mr. Martin and Jason Schwartzman, as the very different men competing for her affection, bring gallantry, farce and sweetness to this funny, sad, insightful movie. (Scott) * THE SQUID AND THE WHALE (R, 88 minutes) Mining his own childhood, Noah Baumbach has put together an unsparing, funny portrait of a family in crisis and a young man trying to figure out his parents and himself. Superbly written and acted, especially by Laura Linney and Jeff Daniels as a pair of divorcing writers. (Scott) USHPIZIN (PG-13, 91 minutes, in Hebrew) In this groundbreaking collaboration between secular and Orthodox Israelis, two roustabouts barge into the home of a Hasid and his wife and make comic trouble. (Holden) * WALLACE & GROMIT: THE CURSE OF THE WERE-RABBIT (G, 85 minutes) The stop-motion pooch and his cheese-loving master, back again at feature length. Silly and sublime. (Scott) THE WEATHER MAN (R, 102 minutes) Yet another movie about a middle-age man gazing into the void of his life; this one was directed by Gore Verbinski and features a fine Nicolas Cage.(Dargis) ZATHURA: A SPACE ADVENTURE (PG, 113 minutes) In this extraterrestrial fantasy, adapted from a Chris Van Allsburg story, a magical board game sends two squabbling young brothers into space to fend off invaders and learn the meaning of brotherhood. The movie is sweeter, gentler and more family-friendly than Jumanji, to which it is the unofficial sequel. (Holden) Film Series CHILDREN IN THE 20TH CENTURY (Through Tuesday) Symphony Space Thalia Films international program of films focusing on problems that affect children concludes with Luis Buñuels first international hit, Los Olvidados (1950), about a teenager in the slums of Mexico City, and Victor Gavirias Rodrigo D: No Futuro (1990), about a teenager in the slums of MedellĂ­n, Colombia. Both films will be shown on Sunday and Tuesday, Leonard Nimoy Thalia, Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, at 95th Street, (212) 864-5400; $10. (Anita Gates) GENA ROWLANDS: AN INDEPENDENT SPIRIT (Through Sunday) This series from BAMcinĂ©matek concludes this weekend with three 1980s films. In Tempest (1982), Paul Mazurskys Shakespearean adaptation, Ms. Rowlands stars with John Cassavetes, her husband, as a modern Prosperos wife. In Woody Allens Another Woman (1988), she plays a New Yorker who eavesdrops on psychotherapy sessions. And in Love Streams (1984), the last film in which she and Cassavetes appeared together, they play a brother and sister struggling with their lives. BAM Rose Cinemas, 30 Lafayette Avenue, at Ashland Place, Fort Greene, Brooklyn, (718) 636-4100; $10. (Gates) A LUMINOUS CENTURY: CELEBRATING NORWEGIAN CINEMA (Through Nov. 29) The Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Norwegian Film Institute have organized this 29-film program representing Norways century-old movie industry. This weekends films include Leif Sindings Defenceless (1939), about orphans used as slave labor on farms; An Enemy of the People (2005), Erik Skjoldbjoergs update of Ibsens classic; Arne Skouens Nine Lives (1957), about the World War II hero Jan Baalsrud; and Next Door (2005), Pal Sletaunes dark comedy about a young mans very strange neighbors. Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th Street, Manhattan, (212) 875-5600; $10. (Gates) A MOVING CAMERA: KENJI MIZOGUCHI (Through Tuesday) BAMcinĂ©mateks series of seven films by Mizoguchi (1898-1956), renowned for his painterly filmmaking and his brilliant direction of women, concludes with a prewar masterpiece and Mizoguchis last film. Mondays feature is The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum (1939), about the doomed relationship of a kabuki actor and a servant girl. Tuesdays is Street of Shame (1956), sympathetic overlapping portraits of prostitutes in postwar Tokyo. BAM Rose Cinemas, 30 Lafayette Avenue, at Ashland Place, Fort Greene, Brooklyn, (718) 636-4100; $10. (Gates) NO VISA REQUIRED: FILMS FROM THE MIDDLE EAST (Through tomorrow) The TriBeCa Film Institute and ArteEasts program concludes tomorrow with The Lizard (2004), an Iranian comedy about an escaped convict who disguises himself as a mullah. Cantor Film Center, New York University, 36 East Eighth Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 941-3890; $10. (Gates) POETRY AND RIGOR: THE FILMS OF GIANNI AMELIO (Through Nov. 30) The Museum of Modern Art and CinecittĂ  Holding are sponsoring an exhibition of 12 films, beginning tonight with Stolen Children (1992), introduced by Mr. Amelio, the Cannes Film Festival grand jury prizewinner about a policeman transporting two siblings to an orphanage. Other films this weekend include Lamerica (1994), Mr. Amelios neorealist drama set in post-Communist Albania; and The Keys to the House (2004), about a father reunited with his disabled son. 11 West 53rd Street, (212) 708-9400; $10. (Gates) Pop Full reviews of recent concerts: nytimes.com/music. RYAN ADAMS AND THE CARDINALS (Tonight) Seemingly reinvigorated by his new band, the prolific (and hotheaded) alt-country songwriter Ryan Adams has some strong new material that offers stylistic restlessness as a sign of depth and demonstrates his honky-tonk versatility. 8, TriBeCa Performing Arts Center, Borough of Manhattan Community College, 199 Chambers Street, (212) 509-0300; free with ticket (details at www.musicdowntown.org). (Laura Sinagra) AMERICAN ANALOG SET (Tonight, tomorrow night and Sunday) A more ethereal version of Death Cab for Cutie, this Austin band plays wistful, conspiratorial pop thats more hum than drone. The group has said this tour will be its last. Tonight at 9, Southpaw, 125 Fifth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn, (718) 230-0236; $14 (sold out). Tomorrow at 10 p.m., Sunday at 11 p.m., Mercury Lounge, 217 East Houston Street, at Ludlow Street, Lower East Side, (212) 260-4700; $12 in advance, $14 at the door. (Sinagra) ANIMAL COLLECTIVE (Sunday) These moody junkyard folk-poppers find a kind of romance in wails and clatter. Their cracked prog jams and urban pastoral chant-alongs map a landscape where fantastical beasts gather for ritual rocking around trashcan campfires. Excepter and Amandine also play. 8 p.m., Webster Hall, 125 East 11th Street, East Village, (212) 353-1600; $18 in advance, $20 at the door. (Sinagra) INDIA.ARIE, RAUL MIDON (Tonight) India.Aries combination of soul and folk stylings and be-yourself uplift paved the way for groups like Floetry. The vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Raul Midon has contributed his talents to the work of many Latin pop superstars. He plays his own material here. 8 p.m., Apollo Theater, 253 West 125th Street, Harlem, (212) 531-5305; $45. (Sinagra) BUJU BANTON (Tuesday) Buju Banton is possessed of one of the best voices and hit catalogs in dancehall. Unfortunately, the purveyor of the anti-gay screed Boom Bye Bye cant seem to leave the topic alone, as he proved at this summers Reggae Carifest. 8 p.m., B. B. King Blues Club and Grill, 243 West 42nd Street, Manhattan, (212) 997-4144; $30 in advance, $35 at the door. (Sinagra) CLEM SNIDE (Tonight) Though Clem Snides nasal wiseacre frontman Eef Barzelay increasingly shows his soft side with pretty tunes influenced by love and fatherhood, this Brooklyn indie rocker hasnt lost his trademark snark. Tonight, hes playing solo. 8, Tonic, 107 Norfolk Street, near Delancey Street, Lower East Side, (212) 358-7503; $12 in advance, $15 at the door. (Sinagra) THE CLIENTELE (Wednesday) This London indie-pop group fills out its sound on recent material, adding strings to its formula -- a mix of modern ironic poses with wistful nostalgia for classic rock n roll and AM radio trifles. Annie Hayden opens. 8 p.m., Knitting Factory, 74 Leonard Street, TriBeCa, (212) 219-3132; $14. (Sinagra) DONNA THE BUFFALO (Tomorrow) Donna the Buffalo is not named after its fiddler and singer, Tara Nevins. Its good-natured rock leans toward the Appalachian side of country music, though it also dips into reggae and Cajun music, with songs that ponder love and humanitys place in the universe. 9 p.m., Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey Street, near the Bowery, Lower East Side, (212) 533-2111; $16 in advance, $18 at the door. (Jon Pareles) ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN (Sunday) Goth rock never goes out of style, but its current boost is good for the Echo and the Bunnymen frontman Ian McCulloch, one of the genres first legitimate babes. The band has new songs but will appease black-clad fans with agitated favorites like The Cutter and The Killing Moon. Innaway opens. 7 p.m., Irving Plaza, 17 Irving Place, at 15th Street, Manhattan, (212) 777-6800; $22.50 in advance, $25 at the door (sold out). (Sinagra) ROBBIE FULKS, JON SPENCER (Tonight) The latest album by Chicagos country curveballer Robbie Fulks again prompts head shaking as to why this off-off-Opry wiseacre isnt a more famous songwriter (or at least a little bigger and richer). As alt-country fans know, hes a crackerjack guitarist and a charismatic performer to boot. The alt-punk bluesman Jon Spencer also plays, with his band Heavy Trash. 7:30, Housing Works Used Book Cafe, 126 Crosby Street, SoHo, (212) 334-3324; $25. (Sinagra) GUSTER (Tonight and tomorrow night) Guster, a band from Boston, has followed the Dave Matthews Bands playbook for building an audience: touring constantly and singing unabashedly earnest folk-rock songs about the painful uncertainties of friendship, love and growing up. 8, Nokia Theater, 1515 Broadway, at 44th Street, ticketmaster.com or (212) 307-7171;$35. (Pareles) H.I.M. (Tonight) This Finnish goth rock bands bid for Stateside success has been the pet cause of TV skate-rat Bam Margera. Now it finally gets a chance to show off its metallic riffs and the infernal majesty of the singer Ville Valo , who wears his heartagram (the bands romantically satanic heart and pentagram symbol) on his sleeve. Finch and Skindred also play. 6, Hammerstein Ballroom, 311 West 34th Street, Manhattan, (212) 279-7740; $28. (Sinagra) IDA, MICHAEL HURLEY (Sunday) With their dreamy folk-pop, the trio Ida combine aching harmonies and a supple sense of play. They perform this free in-store show with one of their quirky antecedents, the folkie Michael Hurley. 7 p.m., Sound Fix Records, 110 Bedford Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, (718) 388-8090; free. (Sinagra) RICKIE LEE JONES, VIC CHESNUTT (Tomorrow) Ms. Joness Southwestern hippie roots give her urban-bohemian jazz leanings a trippy whimsy. You hope this outdoor set will cull from both the swooping multipartite reveries and the ersatz streetcorner jive of her 1970s releases, as well as the best of her songful later albums. Recent material by the Southern Gothic storyteller Vic Chesnutt leans to his darker side. 8 p.m., TriBeCa Performing Arts Center, Borough of Manhattan Community College, 199 Chambers Street, (212) 509-0300; free with ticket (details at www.musicdowntown.org). (Sinagra) LCD SOUNDSYSTEM (Wednesday) With songs like Losing My Edge and Daft Punk Is Playing at My House, the Brooklyn producer and LCD leader James Murphy has proven himself a talented practitioner and master theorist of retro-chic sound, especially the current vogue for refashioning early 80s dance-punk. 7 p.m., Nokia Theater, 1515 Broadway, at 44th Street, ticketmaster.com or (212) 307-7171; $20. (Sinagra) AIMEE MANN, KEREN ANN (Sunday) Ms. Manns recent concept album about two addicts in the 70s who meet at the Virginia fairgrounds features the astute, sad lyrics and low-key but enduring melodic hooks that this singer-songwriter is known for. The chanteuse Keren Ann applies her velvety voice to jazz-inflected, rainy day urban valentines. Her lolling tunes ponder love and travel, admitting that the strongest memory of a visited place is often the homesickness endured there. 8 p.m., TriBeCa Performing Arts Center, Borough of Manhattan Community College, 199 Chambers Street, (212) 509-0300; free with ticket (details at www.musicdowntown.org). (Sinagra) RHETT MILLER (Tuesday and Wednesday) The leader of the once cocky and speedy, then honest and rootsy rock band the Old 97s, Rhett Miller is still writing near-genius tunes though he often leans on formal craft. 7 p.m., Joes Pub, 425 Lafayette Street, at Astor Place, East Village, (212) 539-8778 or (212) 239-6200; $20. (Tuesday sold out) (Sinagra) SHARAM NAZERI (Sunday) Mr. Nazeri holds listeners rapt as he sings Kurdish songs, Persian classical music and Sufi songs based on the poems of Rumi; his voice can take on the humble clarity of Gregorian chant, or it can leap and swoop and ululate. 7 p.m., Town Hall, 123 West 43rd Street, Manhattan, (212) 840-2824 or (212) 545-7536; $30 to $50. (Pareles) NEW SOUNDS FROM POLAND (Tomorrow) This glimpse into new Polish music features sets by the accordion-based group the Motion Trio, and Lautari, an improvisatory ensemble inspired by folk traditions of Poland, Romania and Macedonia. 8 p.m., Peter Norton Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, at 95th Street, (212) 864-5400; $26. (Sinagra) THE NORTH MISSISSIPPI ALLSTARS (Tonight) The Southern rock band North Mississippi All-Stars plays an asymmetrical, cantankerous blues from the hill country near where the members grew up, then turn it into jam-band music. 8, Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey Street, near the Bowery, Lower East Side, (212) 533-2111; $20 in advance, $22 at the door. (Pareles) SAM CHAMPION (Tuesday) Local indie rock has been largely dominated by neo-formalist technicians as of late, making this quartets looser approach, which harkens back to the slacker ennui epitomized by Pavement, a welcome addition. 8 p.m., Mercury Lounge, 217 East Houston Street, at Ludlow Street, Lower East Side, (212) 260-4700; $10. (Sinagra) RICHARD SHINDELL, LUCY KAPLANSKY (Tonight) In Richard Shindells character studies, finely observed details suddenly add up to a larger picture that can be compassionate or troubling; he writes about a Civil War widow, an interrogator trying to turn a witness, a fugitive phoning his family. Lucy Kaplansky shares the bill. 8:30 p.m., Zankel Hall, Carnegie Hall, (212) 247-7800; $32 to $38 (sold out). (Pareles) CARLY SIMON, BEN TAYLOR, SALLY TAYLOR (Tuesday) Carly Simons hits like Anticipation and Youre So Vain endure as evergreen go-girl inspirationals. She plays after opening sets by her children Ben and Sally Taylor. 8 p.m., Jazz at Lincoln Center, Frederick P. Rose Hall, Time Warner Center, Broadway at 60th Street, (212) 258-9800; $95 to $150. (Sinagra) TRISTEZA (Tonight) This San Diego band plays instrumental music that augments rock with electronica. 9, Northsix, 66 North Sixth Street, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, (718) 599-5103; $10. (Sinagra) U2, PATTI SMITH (Monday and Tuesday) After 2000s thrilling All That You Cant Leave Behind (Interscope), U2s How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb (Interscope) focuses on what humans can live without: namely, intercontinental ballistic missiles and third-world debt. The punk rock icon Patti Smith convenes her band to show young acolytes like the Fiery Furnaces how its done in this year marking the 30th anniversary of her incendiary, poetic album Horses (Arista). 8 p.m., Madison Square Garden, (212) 465-6741: $54 to $169.50. (Sinagra) UMPHREYS MCGEE (Tonight and tomorrow night) Umphreys McGee has twin guitars and some jam-band roots, but its songs are more elaborate than the usual head-bobbing vamps; theyre full of meter-shifting convolutions and jazzy twists that move close to progressive rock. 9, Irving Plaza, 17 Irving Place at 15th Street, Manhattan, (212) 777-6800; $22.50, $25 at the door. (Pareles) VODoU DRUMS AND DANCES OF HAITI (Tonight) The Afro-Haitian group La Troupe Makandal performs ritual drumming and chants in the vodou style. The Haitian vocalist Emeline Michel appears as special guest. 8, Peter Norton Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, at 95th Street, (212) 864-5400; $25. (Sinagra) DAR WILLIAMS (Tomorrow) This adorable coffeehouse singer-songwriter combines a sweet voice with that rare quality of seeming like a real person. 8 p.m., Society for Ethical Culture, 2 West 64th Street, Manhattan, www.concertstonight.com, (212) 307-7171; $45 and $50. (Sinagra) Cabaret Full reviews of recent cabaret shows: nytimes.com/music. BARBARA CARROLL (Sunday) Even when swinging out, this Lady of a Thousand Songs remains an impressionist with special affinities for Thelonious Monk and bossa nova. 2 p.m., Oak Room, Algonquin Hotel, 59 West 44th Street, Manhattan, (212) 419-9331; $55, including brunch at noon. (Stephen Holden) * BILL CHARLAP AND SANDY STEWART (Tonight and tomorrow night) The profound, unadorned performances of standards by the jazz pianist Bill Charlap and his mother, the singer Sandy Stewart, are as deep as cabaret gets nowadays; not to be missed. 9 and 11:30, Oak Room, Algonquin Hotel, 59 West 44th Street, Manhattan, (212) 419-9331; $50 cover, with a $50 prix fixe dinner at the early shows and a $20 minimum at the late shows. (Holden) ANNIE ROSS (Tomorrow) Cool, funny, swinging and indestructible, this 75-year-old singer and sometime actress exemplifies old-time hip in its most generous incarnation. 7 p.m., Dannys Skylight Room, 346 West 46th Street, Clinton, (212) 265-8133; $25, with a $12 minimum. (Holden) SINGING ASTAIRE (Tomorrow and Sunday) This smart, airy revue, which pays tribute to Fred Astaire, has returned, featuring Eric Comstock, Hilary Kole and Christopher Gines. 5:30 p.m., Birdland, 315 West 44th Street, Clinton, (212) 581-3080; $30, with a $10 minimum. (Holden) STEVE TYRELL (Tonight and tomorrow night, and Tuesday through Thursday) Mr. Tyrell has one of those where-have-I-heard-it-before growls that sounds great on a movie soundtrack but loses its charm in a club as he rolls standards off the assembly line as if they were all the same song. 8:45, with additional shows at 10:45 tonight and tomorrow night, Cafe Carlyle, Carlyle Hotel, 35 East 76th Street, Manhattan, (212) 744-1600; $95 tonight and tomorrow; $85 Tuesday through Thursday. (Holden) Jazz Full reviews of recent jazz concerts: nytimes.com/music. ERIC ALEXANDER QUARTET WITH VON FREEMAN (Tuesday through Nov. 27) Mr. Alexander is one of the leading young inheritors of a muscular tenor saxophone style associated with the 1950s; the octogenarian Mr. Freeman, dropping in from his native Chicago, is one of the unsung but widely emulated heroes of that style. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., with an 11:30 set on Friday and Saturday, Dizzys Club Coca-Cola, Frederick P. Rose Hall, 60th Street and Broadway, Jazz at Lincoln Center, (212) 258-9595; $30, with a minimum of $10 at tables, $5 at the bar. (Nate Chinen) OMER AVITAL GROUP (Wednesday) The bassist Omer Avital, a staple of the West Village club Smalls during its pre-millennial first run, has recently returned after a spell in his native Israel. He performs here with several no-nonsense players: the tenor saxophonist Joel Frahm, the pianist Omer Klein and the drummer Jonathan Blake. 8 p.m., Smalls, 183 West 10th Street, West Village, (212) 675-7369; cover, $20. (Chinen) ROY AYERS BAND WITH BOBBI HUMPHREY (Through Sunday) Mr. Ayers, a vibraphonist, and Ms. Humphrey, a flutist, helped precipitate the 1970s boom in Afro-centric jazz-funk; that sounds refurbished cachet has made both artists newly relevant in recent years. 8 and 10 p.m., Iridium, 1650 Broadway, at 51st Street, (212) 582-2121; cover, $32.50 to $35, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) MAURICE BROWN QUINTET (Tonight and tomorrow night) Mr. Brown, a young trumpeter recently displaced from the New Orleans scene, plays an extroverted strain of modern jazz that borrows from soul as well as bop; his partners here are Derek Douget on tenor saxophone, Jonathan Baptiste on piano, Peter Washington on bass and Billy Drummond on drums. 8 10, Sweet Rhythm, 88 Seventh Avenue South, at Bleecker Street, West Village, (212) 255-3626; cover, $20, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) JAMES CARNEY GROUP (Tonight and Tuesday) Mr. Carney, a sharp keyboardist and an imaginative conceptualist and composer, leads an ensemble consisting of fellow bandleader-composers: Ralph Alessi on trumpet, Jerome Sabbagh on saxophones, Chris Lightcap on bass, and either Shane Endsley or Mark Ferber on drums. Tonight at 10 and 11:30, Kavehaz, 37 West 26th Street, Manhattan, (212) 343-0612; no cover. Tuesday at 9 and 10:30 p.m., Koze Lounge, 676 Fifth Avenue, at 20th Street, Park Slope, Brooklyn, (718) 832-8282; cover, $7.(Chinen) STEPHAN CRUMPS ROSETTA TRIO (Wednesday) An intriguing string-based ensemble, featuring the compositions and bass playing of Mr. Crump, and the guitar work of Liberty Ellman (acoustic) and Jamie Fox (electric). 8 p.m., Barbes, 376 Ninth Street, at Sixth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn, (718) 965-9177; cover, $8. (Chinen) LOU DONALDSON QUARTET (Through Sunday) Bebop, blues and boogaloo are all fair game for the veteran alto saxophonist Lou Donaldson, who receives strong support here from Dr. Lonnie Smith on Hammond B-3 organ and Randy Johnston on guitar. 9 and 11 p.m., Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, West Village, (212) 255-4037; cover, $20 to $25, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) SCOTT DUBOIS GROUP (Sunday) Mr. Dubois, a young guitarist equally devoted to intricate compositional forms and spacious free improvisation, leads an ensemble stocked with kindred souls: the saxophonists Tony Malaby and Jason Rigby, the bassist Eivind Opsvik and the drummer Mark Ferber. 9:30 p.m., 55 Bar, 55 Christopher Street, West Village, (212) 929-9883; cover, $7. (Chinen) DAVID GILMORE QUARTET (Monday) Mr. Gilmore favors the clean guitar tone of George Benson, but his playing tends more toward rhythmic aggression and sharp corners; his cohesive band includes George Colligan on keyboards, Brad Jones on bass and Derrek Phillips on drums. 10 p.m., 55 Bar, 55 Christopher Street, West Village, (212) 929-9883; cover, $10. (Chinen) JOHN HART TRIO (Tonight) The guitarist John Hart approaches both standards and originals with the same modern sensibility; his rhythm section consists of Bill Moring on bass and Anthony Pinciotti on drums. 7 and 9, Enzos Jazz at the Jolly Hotel Madison Towers, 22 East 38th Street, at Madison Avenue, (212) 802-0600; cover, $15, with a one-drink minimum. (Chinen) MARK HELIASS OPEN LOOSE (Tonight) Together with the tenor saxophonist Tony Malaby and the drummer Gerald Cleaver, the bassist and composer Mark Helias walks a line between form and freedom, confirming that there can be rigor in both. 9, Cornelia Street CafĂ©, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village, (212) 989-9319; cover, $10, with a one-drink minimum. (Chinen) JAZZ BATTLES AT DIZZYS CLUB (Tomorrow) Invoking the tradition of cutting-room sessions at an unlikely hour, Dizzys Club plays host to three free Saturday matinees: a warm-up round with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra rhythm section; a face-off between the trombonists Andre Hayward and Steve Davis; and a showdown featuring the baritone saxophonists Joe Temperley and Gary Smulyan. 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Dizzys Club Coca-Cola, Frederick P. Rose Hall, 60th Street and Broadway, Jazz at Lincoln Center, (212) 258-9595; no cover. (Chinen) ILONA KNOPFLER (Tuesday) Ms. Knopfler is an effervescent chanteuse who divides her time between Paris and Atlanta; her recent album Life the Life (Mack Avenue) places her translucent vocals in a variety of jazz settings. 8 and 10 p.m., Sweet Rhythm, 88 Seventh Avenue South, at Bleecker Street, West Village, (212) 255-3626; cover, $15, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) * LEE KONITZ QUARTET (Wednesday through Nov. 26) Mr. Konitz lends his venerable reputation and dry-martini alto saxophone to this ensemble, which features the resourceful bop-leaning guitarist Peter Bernstein. 9 and 11 p.m., Birdland, 315 West 44th Street, Clinton, (212) 581-3080; cover, $30, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) FRANK LACYS VIBE TRIBE (Tonight) Mr. Lacy is a trombonist with a free spirit but a taste for tonality; this midsize ensemble, not quite a big band, features such team players as the saxophonists Abraham Burton and Salim Washington and the pianist Dave Kikoski. 9 and 10:30, Jazz Gallery, 290 Hudson Street, at Spring Street, South Village, (212) 242-1063; cover, $15, members, $12. (Chinen) ADAM LEVY TRIO/ STEVEN BERNSTEINS MILLENNIAL TERRITORY ORCHESTRA (Monday) The guitarist Adam Levy, best known for his association with Norah Jones, draws upon a broader dynamic range in his trio with the bassist Todd Sickafoose and the drummer Ben Perowsky; the MTO, a little big band led by the slide trumpeter Steven Bernstein, dusts off an obscure swing-era repertory with showmanship and irreverence. 8 p.m., Tonic, 107 Norfolk Street, near Delancey Street, Lower East Side, (212) 358-7501; cover, $12. (Chinen) * BRAD MEHLDAU TRIO (Tuesday through Nov. 27) With Day Is Done (Nonesuch), the pianist Brad Mehldau has renovated the sound of his longstanding trio, with considerable help from the powerfully expressive drummer Jeff Ballard; the groups luminous brand of lyricism has survived, but its repertory is more pop-inflected, and its rhythmic push more pronounced. 9 and 11 p.m., with a 12:30 set on Nov. 25 and 26, Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, at 11th Street, West Village, (212) 255-4037; cover, $25, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) BEN MONDER GROUP (Thursday) In the hands of Mr. Monder, the electric guitar is a coloristic instrument first and foremost; his fine recent album, Oceana (Sunnyside), showcases his dizzyingly proficient solo workouts and his coolly convoluted pieces for trio. 9 p.m., Barbes, 376 Ninth Street, at Sixth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn, (718) 965-9177; cover, $8. (Chinen) OSCAR NORIEGA TRIO (Tonight) Mr. Noriega, a clarinetist and saxophonist, taps into raw but focused energies in this group with the bassist Trevor Dunn and the drummer Tom Rainey; theyre joined by the versatile singer Allyssa Lamb. 8, Barbes, 376 Ninth Street, at Sixth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn, (718) 965-9177; cover, $8. (Chinen) GREG OSBY (Through Sunday) Tomorrow and Sunday, Mr. Osbys hard-charging trio with the bassist Matt Brewer and the drummer Jeff (Tain) Watts will reprise material from Channel Three, a strong recent Blue Note album; tonight and tomorrow, Mr. Osby will lead his current quartet, with Cory Smythe on piano, Mr. Brewer on bass and Rodney Green on drums. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., with an 11:30 set tonight and tomorrow night, Jazz Standard, 116 East 27th Street, Manhattan, (212) 576-2232; cover, $25. (Chinen) MARCUS ROBERTS TRIO (Through Sunday) Mr. Roberts has been an exemplar of blues-based jazz piano since his 1980s tenure with Wynton Marsalis; the bassist Roland Guerin and the drummer Jason Marsalis round out his excellent working trio. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., with an 11:30 set Fridays and Saturdays, Dizzys Club Coca-Cola, Frederick P. Rose Hall, 60th Street and Broadway, Jazz at Lincoln Center, (212) 258-9595; $30, with a minimum of $10 at tables, $5 at the bar.(Chinen) * ROSWELL RUDDS 70TH-BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION (Sunday) Mr. Rudd is a veteran trombonist who closely heeds an exploratory muse; on his new album, Blue Mongol (Sunnyside), he finds a common language with throat singers from Mongolia. But he celebrates his 70th birthday more traditionally, with a reunion of Elis Chosen Six, a Dixieland group with which he played in the 1950s at Yale. 3 p.m., Rubin Museum of Art, 150 West 17th Street, Chelsea, (212) 620-5000; $15. (Chinen) * LUCIANA SOUZA QUARTET (Tonight) Ms. Souza, a Brazilian turned New Yorker, hones a personal and highly intelligent variety of jazz singing in this ensemble, with Adam Rogers on guitar, Scott Colley on bass and Nasheet Waits on drums. 9:30,, Joes Pub, 425 Lafayette Street, at Astor Place, East Village, (212) 539-8778; cover, $20, with a two-drink minimum. (Chinen) RORY STUART QUARTET (Tomorrow) Mr. Stuart is a guitarist with a lithe and harmonically literate style; his ensemble features the smart, somewhat reclusive Mark Shim on tenor saxophone and the sterling rhythm team of Francois Moutin and Ari Hoenig on bass and drums. 9 p.m., Cornelia Street CafĂ©, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village, (212) 989-9319; cover, $12 (students, $9), with a one-drink minimum. (Chinen) * TOOTS THIELEMANS AND KENNY WERNER (Through Sunday) The Dutch harmonica master Toots Thielemans and the American pianist Kenny Werner have recorded fruitfully together in recent years; here theyll focus on Brazilian music, an area of specialty for Mr. Thielemans, in an all-star ensemble featuring the guitarist Oscar Castro-Neves and the percussionist Airto Moreira. 8 and 10:30 p.m., Blue Note, 131 West Third Street, West Village, (212) 475-8592; cover, $35 at tables, with a $5 minimum or $20 at the bar and a one-drink $5 minimum.(Chinen) WYNTON WITH STRINGS: 25TH YEAR CELEBRATION (Tonight and tomorrow night) Backed by his quartet and a string orchestra, the trumpeter Wynton Marsalis plays romantic jazz standards with a tender sort of effulgence. 8, Frederick P. Rose Hall, 60th Street and Broadway, Jazz at Lincoln Center, (212) 721-6500; $30 to $130. (Chinen) Classical Full reviews of recent music performances: nytimes.com/music. Opera CARMEN (Tomorrow and Wednesday) Shes back. After an initial flurry of less well-known Carmens at the Met this season, Denyce Graves is taking up one of her signature roles for a run of performances into December. And Marcello Giordani, with Don JosĂ©, is coming into a role that should allow him to shine. Ana Maria Martinez, a young soprano with a burgeoning international career, makes her company debut as MicaĂ«la. 8 p.m., Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center, (212) 362-6000; $220 tickets remaining tomorrow; $26 to $175 on Wednesday. (Anne Midgette) THE LITTLE PRINCE (Today, tomorrow and Sunday) Francesca Zambellos production, with bright, sure sets by Maria Bjornson, is gorgeous. And Rachel Portmans opera is opulent, with a veritably lush orchestra and a large childrens chorus. All of this is an odd fit for the spareness of Antoine de Saint-ExupĂ©rys beloved book, which inspired it, but it makes for a colorful spectacle -- though it would lose nothing by being half an hour shorter. Tonight at 8, Saturday and Sunday afternoon at 1:30, New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, (212) 721-6500; remaining tickets, $79 tonight, $25 to $65 tomorrow and $45 to $65 on Sunday. (Midgette) LE NOZZE DI FIGARO (Tomorrow) Jonathan Millers spare, elegant production affords Mozarts music ample room to breathe. The solid cast includes Luca Pisaroni, Lisa Milne, Peter Mattei and Hei-Kyung Hong. Sandra Piques Eddy replaces Joyce DiDonato as Cherubino. 1:30 p.m., Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center, (212) 362-6000; $42 to $220. (Jeremy Eichler) LA TRAVIATA (Tonight, tomorrow and Sunday) The venerable Amato Opera may seat scarcely more than 100, but it cant be accused of cowardice. Its current run, now in its final weekend, is one of the hardest operas for soprano in the repertory, Verdis Traviata. Tonight and tomorrow night at 7:30, Sunday afternoon at 2:30, Amato Opera, 319 Bowery, at Second Street, East Village, (212) 228-8200; $30; 65+, students and children, $25. (Midgette) TURANDOT (Tomorrow) If your idea of a stimulating evening is watching a beefy and clearly none too intelligent prince devoting himself singlemindedly to winning the heart of a creepy harridan -- and, O.K., singing Nessun Dorma along the way -- the companys venerable Beni Montresor staging (now directed by Beth Greenberg) is back on the boards. Its strong cast includes Lori Phillips in the title role, Philip Webb as Calaf and Guylaine Girard as LiĂč. 8 p.m., New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, (212) 721-6500; $25 to $120. (Allan Kozinn) Classical Music AMERICAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Tonight) Witold Lutoslawskis orchestral works have slipped into the standard repertory to a great extent, but programs focusing on his music exclusively are rare. Leon Botstein has assembled a great overview, from the classic Musique FunĂšbre (1958) to the increasingly popular violin concerto Chain 2 (1985). Included as well as are two symphonies, the First (1947) and the Third (1983). 8, Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center, (212) 721-6500; $25 to $53. (Kozinn) BARGEMUSIC (Tonight, tomorrow, Sunday and Thursday) Vladimir Stoupel, a pianist, is holding forth this week, alone and with friends, at this intimate chamber hall on a converted coffee barge. Tonight, Mr. Stoupel plays a program of five Scriabin sonatas (Nos. 2, 3, 8, 9 and 10). He spends the rest of the weekend playing works by Schubert, Bach, Schumann and Joan Tower with Judith Ingolfsson, the violinist, and on Thursday, he is joined by Mark Peskanov, the violinist, and Peter Bruns, the cellist, for a program of Haydn and Brahms. Tonight, tomorrow night and Thursday night at 7:30; Sunday at 4 p.m.; Bargemusic, Fulton Ferry Landing next to the Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn, (718) 624-2083; $35; $25 for students. (Kozinn) JENNIFER CHECK (Tuesday) She does small roles at the Met but has a big voice to watch. This young soprano, an alumna of the Mets Lindemann program and already presented in New York by the Marilyn Horne Foundation, won first place in the Young Concert Artists auditions this year, and as a result is giving her Carnegie recital debut with a program of Purcell, Richard Strauss, Schumann and others. Laura Ward is the piano accompanist. 7:30 p.m., Zankel Hall, Carnegie Hall, (212) 247-7800; $25 and $35. (Midgette) CHOIR OF ST. IGNATIUS LOYOLA AND PIFFARO (Tonight) Kent Tritle leads his superb choir, with accompaniment from Piffaro, a fine period-instrument band, in music of the German Baroque. Included are SchĂŒtzs Ich danke dem Herrn (SWV 34), Praetoriuss Nun komm der Heiden Heiland and Scheidts Hymnaria. 8, with a preconcert organ recital by Scott Warren at 7. Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, 980 Park Avenue, at 84th Street, (212) 288-2520; $25 to $45. (Kozinn) EARLY MUSIC NEW YORK (Tomorrow and Sunday) Arguing that although public church performances of the time were sung by men, women sang sacred music in convents and secular music at court, this venerable ensemble has taken to presenting an annual concert sung and played by women. This years installment is an overview of sacred and secular works by the Franco-Flemish masters of the 15th and 16th centuries, among them Dufay, Binchois, Ockeghem, Obrecht and Josquin. Tomorrow at 8 p.m., Sunday at 3 p.m., Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue, at 112th Street, Morningside Heights, (212) 280-0330; $40. (Kozinn) JUPITER SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS (Monday) In the spirit of its idiosyncratic founder, Jens Nygaard, this feisty ensemble offers programs that combine oddities and either familiar works or lesser-known scores by well-known composers. This week the focus is on virtuoso playing and includes music by Boccherini, Paganini, Respighi, Verdi, Rossini and Gambaro. 2 and 7:30 p.m., Good Shepherd Presbyterian Church, 152 West 66th Street, Manhattan, (212) 799-1259; $10 to $25. (Kozinn) NEW JUILLIARD ENSEMBLE (Tuesday) This student group, led by Joel Sachs, plays difficult music in virtually every contemporary style, and usually does it with assurance and polish. This program, part of the season-long celebration of the Juilliard Schools centenary, includes the premiere of Adam Schoenbergs Chiaroscuro, as well as works by AgustĂ­n FernĂĄndez, Liu Sola, Miguiel del Aguila and Virko Baley. 8 p.m., Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center, (212) 769-7406; free, but tickets are required. (Kozinn) PRISM QUARTET (Tonight) This fine veteran saxophone ensemble tackles the rock-influenced music of the Dutch composer Jacob ter Veldhuis, including Postnuclear Winterscenario No. 10 and Pitch Black for saxophone quartet and boom box. 8:30, Thalia at Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, at 95th Street, (212) 864-5400; $21, students and 65+, $18. (Eichler) REBEL (Sunday) Rebel, one of the more successful operatives in New Yorks accident-prone early-music world, brings music for recorders and strings to the Music Before 1800 series. 4 p.m., Corpus Christi Christi Church, 529 West 121st Street, Morningside Heights, (212) 666-9266; $25 to $40; $20 to $35 for students and 62+. (Bernard Holland) PAULA ROBISON (Tomorrow) This excellent flutist and her audiences never seem to tire of music by Vivaldi, and she is sure to play it here with her usual flair. But it would also be good, for a change, to find out what else is on her musical mind. 7 p.m., Temple of Dendur, Metropolitan Museum of Art, (212) 570-3949; $60. (James R. Oestreich) ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Tonight and tomorrow night) The highly touted David Robertson makes his first New York appearance as music director of the orchestra, tonight centering on music of Debussy (and paintings of Monet) and tomorrow presenting works by Mozart, Mahler and Morton Feldman. 8, Carnegie Hall, (212) 247-7800; tonight, $10 to $35; tomorrow, $23 to $79.(Oestreich) ANTTI SIIRALA (Tonight) Antti Siirala, a busy and successful veteran of the piano competition wars in Britain, brings four Beethoven piano sonatas, including Les Adieux and the delectable little F sharp major Sonata. 8, Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium, Metropolitan Museum of Art, (212) 570-3949; $40. (Holland) BAIBA SKRIDE (Sunday) Lincoln Center brings back its series of casual Sunday morning concerts followed by a reception. Here, this young Latvian violinist is accompanied by her sister Lauma in works by Schubert, Prokofiev, Copland and Ravel. 11 a.m., Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th Street, Manhattan, (212) 721-6500; $20. (Eichler) Dance Full reviews of recent performances: nytimes.com/dance. American Ballet Theater Studio Company and Sean Curran: Works and Process (Sunday and Monday) This ongoing series at the Guggenheim Museum allows a behind-the-scenes look at the creative process; in this case the choreographer Sean Curran will talk to Kathleen Moore about making a work for Ballet Theaters junior division, and the dancers will perform excerpts from the piece. 8 p.m., 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 89th Street, (212) 423-3500; $24 or $18 for members, 65+ and students. (Roslyn Sulcas) BALLET MESTIZO (Tonight through Sunday) Opening tonight for a one-month engagement, the company performs Colombian folk dance and music. Tonight and tomorrow night at 8; Sunday at 4 p.m. (weekends through Dec. 11), Thalia Spanish Theater, 41-17 Greenpoint Avenue, Sunnyside, Queens, (718) 729-3880 or www.thaliatheatre.org; $25 (tonight); $30 (other nights); students and 65+, $27. (Jennifer Dunning) THE BARNARD PROJECT (Tonight through Sunday) Student dancers from Barnard College will perform works by Ori Flomin, David Parker and Donna Uchizono. Tonight at 7:30; Sunday at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Dance Theater Workshop, 219 West 19th Street, Chelsea, (212) 924-0077 or www.dtw.org; $25; $15 for students and 65+. (Dunning) * BATSHEVA DANCE COMPANY (Through Nov. 27) Israels leading modern-dance company performs Mamootot, a new work by Israels leading choreographer, Ohad Naharin, presented by the Next Wave festival in an extremely intimate space. Tonight and tomorrow night at 7:30; Sunday and Nov. 27 at 3 p.m., tomorrow and Nov. 26 at 9:30 p.m., Tuesday, Wednesday and Nov. 26 at 7:30 p.m., Nov. 26 at 9:30 p.m., James and Martha Duffy Performance Space, Mark Morris Dance Center, 3 Lafayette Avenue, Fort Greene, Brooklyn, (718) 636-4100 or www.bam.org; $40 (sold out).(John Rockwell) BODYVOX (Tonight through Sunday) In Civilization Unplugged the choreographers Jamey Hampton and Ashley Roland whimsically visit technological evolution. Tonight at 8, tomorrow at 2 and 8 p.m., Sunday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue, at 19th Street, Chelsea, (212) 242-0800 or www.Joyce.org; $36. (Jack Anderson) CHASHAMA: TRANSIT (Today through Sunday) Eleanor Dubinsky explores travel in a free dance piece with simultaneous video projections from five cities throughout the world, in a storefront and gallery space. (This weekend and next.) Today through Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. (open rehearsals) and 5 to 9 p.m. (performances), Chashama Window Gallery, 266 West 37th Street, Manhattan., www.chashama.org (Dunning) CREACH/COMPANY (Tonight through Sunday night) An all-male group directed by Terry Creach offers a theatrical collage of choreographic portraits of men featuring dramatic interactions among dancers, readings from performers diaries and the depiction of what Mr. Creach calls a broken-hearts club of guys. 8, Joyce SoHo, 155 Mercer Street, (212) 334-7479; $15; $12 students and 65+.(Anderson) SAVION GLOVER (Tonight) This distinguished tap stylist will perform to music by choreographers as various as Bach and Piazzolla in Classical Savion. 8, New Jersey Performing Arts Center, 1 Center Street, Newark, (888) 466-5772 or www.njpac.org; $20 to $56. (Dunning) JANE GOLDBERG: BELLY TAP FOR WORLD PEACE (Tonight through Sunday night) Known as the originator of the tap and schmooze school of dance, Ms. Goldberg is also a performer who embodies a good deal of recent tap history. (Weekends through Nov. 26.) 8, Blue Mountain Gallery, 530 West 25th Street, Chelsea, (212) 393-1182; suggested donation, $15 to $25 (Dunning) GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS (Tonight through Sunday and Wednesday) Direct from China, with cables to twirl on, hoops to spin and bodies to twist to pretzel shapes. (Through Jan. 1.) Tonight at 7, tomorrow and Wednesday at 2 and 7 p.m., Sunday at noon and 5 p.m., New Victory Theater, 209 West 42nd Street, Manhattan, (212) 239-6200 or www.newvictory.org; $10 to $50. (Dunning) HEATHER HARRINGTON DANCE COMPANY (Tonight through Sunday night) Ms. Harrington fills the sanctuary stage-space with toys and childrens songs, incorporated by the composer Quentin Chiappetta, in her new Devils Playground. 8:30, Danspace Project, St. Marks Church, 131 East 10th Street, East Village, (212) 674-8194 or www.danspaceproject.org; $15 or T.D.F. vouchers. (Dunning) RENNIE HARRIS (Tomorrow and Sunday) Mr. Harris, whose choreography is an imaginative merger of hip-hop and concert dance, will present two works-in-progress, PrinceScareKrows Road to the Emerald City and Origins of Man, a collaboration with Rodney Mason. Reservations required. Tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. (PrinceScareKrow); tomorrow at 5:30 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. (Origins), Aaron Davis Hall, City College, West 135th Street and Convent Avenue, Hamilton Heights, (212) 650-7100 or www.aarondavishall.org; $20 (PrinceScareKrow); free (Origins). (Dunning) STUART HODES, GUS SOLOMONS JR. AND ALICE TEIRSTEIN (Today) Age has not withered nor custom staled the charms of these veteran performers, who will show Three Oh Three at this lunchtime series, which includes discussion with the audience. Noon, Buttenwieser Hall, 92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Avenue, (212) 415-5500; free. (Sulcas) JAZZ TAP ENSEMBLE (Tuesday through Nov. 27) Lynn Dally, director of this troupe of young tappers, offers a slew of new works -- two accompanied live by the jazz vocalist Kate McGarry. Tuesday and Wednesday at 8 p.m. (no show on Thursday), Friday at 2 and 8 p.m., Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue, Chelsea, (212) 242-0800; $40. (Sulcas) LABAN/BARTENIEFF INSTITUTE FOR MOVEMENT STUDIES (Tuesday) Under the title Dancers and Cultural Identity, the institute presents works by choreographers from the United States, Brazil, Cuba, France and Korea. 8 p.m., St. Marks Church, 131 East 10th Street, East Village, (212) 643-8888; $20. (Rockwell) * NEW YORK CITY BALLET (Through Feb. 26) The winter season gets under way with a gala offering Peter Martinss Fearful Symmetries and Robbinss N.Y. Export: Opus Jazz, along with a new pas de deux by Albert Evans. The annual run of The Nutcracker is from Nov. 25 through Dec. 30, followed by the regular repertory season Jan. 3 through Feb. 26. Tuesday at 7:30 p.m., New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, (212) 721-6500 after Monday; $20 to $100; for gala tickets, (212) 870-5585. (Rockwell) THE SHUA GROUP (Tomorrow and Sunday) A Jersey City contemporary dance company presents three works that offer collaborations with a saxophonist and a video artist. In 1000 nows audience members are invited onstage. Scary. 8 p.m., ghe Construction Company, 10 East 18th Street, Buzzer 3, Flatiron District, (212) 924-7882; $15; students and 65+, $10. (Sulcas) JOHANNES WIELAND (Tonight through Sunday night) A program of new works includes choreographic commentaries on the nature-versus-nurture debate, the forming and breaking of relationships and the power of images as presented in the media. 8, Ailey Studios at the Citigroup Theater, 405 West 55th Street, Clinton, (347) 329-5526 or reservations@johanneswieland.org; $20; students, $15. (Anderson) Art Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. Museums AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM: OBSESSIVE DRAWING, through March 19. In the museums first emerging talent show, one of the five artists selected is 83, lives in a home for the elderly in Pennsylvania and stopped painting two years ago because of failing eyesight. Overall, the work in the exhibition is abstract and spare, giving the problematic outsider category a new spin. 45 West 53rd Street, (212) 265-1040. (Holland Cotter) Asia society: Vietnam: Destination for the New Millennium -- The Art of Dinh Q. LE, through Jan. 15. Born in Vietnam, Mr. Le moved to the United States at 11 and received a Master of Fine Arts degree from the School of Visual Arts in New York. This small exhibition presents high-concept photographic and sculptural works about the Vietnam War and its effects, as well as a pair of sculptures representing communications satellites that satirize Vietnams plans to enter the space age. 725 Park Avenue, at 70th Street, (212) 288-6400.(Ken Johnson) Brooklyn Museum: Edward Burtynsky: Manufactured Landscapes, through Jan. 15. Large, expertly made color images by a Canadian photographer show industrial subjects like marble quarries in India, a tire dump in California and modern development in China. 200 Eastern Parkway, at Prospect Park, Brooklyn, (718) 638-5000. (Johnson) * THE FRICK COLLECTION: MEMLINGS PORTRAITS, through Dec. 31. Just over 30 portrait paintings by Hans Memling survive from the 15th century. Of those, about 20 are now on view at the Frick Collection. Thats a whale of a lot of paintings by any major early northern European artist to be in any one place at one time, and there is little question that this show will figure on any short list of outstanding events of the year. 1 East 70th Street, (212) 288-0700. (Cotter) GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM: RUSSIA!, through Jan. 11. This survey of nine centuries of Russian art ranges from 13th-century religious icons to a smattering of 21st-century works, achieving its astounding effect without resorting to a single egg, or anything else, by FabergĂ©. It immerses us in two enormous, endlessly fascinating narratives: the history of painting and the history of Russia, forming a remarkable tribute to the endurance of the medium and the country, and the inescapable interconnectedness of art and life. 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 89th Street, (212) 423-3600. (Roberta Smith) * JAPAN SOCIETY: HIROSHI SUGIMOTO: HISTORY OF HISTORY, through Feb. 19. A very personal, whimsical exhibition by this well-known Japanese photographer, who incorporates into his work artifacts that he has collected, particularly from East Asia and Japan. Mr. Sugimotos reach is long, and his range is broad, from fossils to textiles to undersea dioramas to Japanese calligraphy to the Trylon and Perisphere (a minisculpture) that symbolized the New York Worlds Fair of 1939. It may not be all that enlightening, but as an artists personal survey, it comes off. 333 East 47th Street, (212) 832-1155. (Grace Glueck) * JEWISH MUSEUM: THE JEWISH IDENTITY PROJECT: NEW AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY, through Jan. 29. Whos Jewish, who isnt, and, by the way, what is a Jew, anyway? They are not easy questions, as this intense who-are-we exploration makes clear. Ten projects by 13 artists try to help break the stereotype of American Jews as uniformly white, middle-class and of European descent. Using photography and video, they have interpreted their missions broadly, from the Korean-born Nikki S. Lees meticulous staging of a Jewish wedding with herself as the bride, to Andrea Robbins and Max Bechers look at the thriving shtetl established by Lubavitcher Hasidic Jews in the rural community of Postville, Iowa. 1109 Fifth Avenue, at 92nd Street, (212) 423-3200. (Glueck) * Metropolitan Museum of Art: FRA ANGELICO, through Jan. 29. An exhibition as rare as it is sublime brings the divine Angelico down to earth, showing how he had the best of both worlds, using the innovations of the Renaissance to parlay the radiant colors, gilded surfaces and doll-like figures of Gothic art into a final flowering. Fifth Avenue and 82nd Street, (212) 535-7710. (Smith) * MET: THE PERFECT MEDIUM: PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE OCCULT, through Dec. 31. Hands down, the most hilarious, not to mention the most charming, exhibition the Met has done in years: an assemblage of 19th-century and early-20th-century spirit photographs, sĂ©ance reportage and other examples of transparent tomfoolery. Like all examples of great humor, it is, at heart, also a sneakily serious affair. Its subjects include the depths of human gullibility and the conjuring power of photography, whose technology, we may forget in the cynical day of digital manipulation and Photoshop, seemed unfathomable to so many people a century and more ago. The exhibitions deeper subject is the dreamer in all of us. (See above.) (Michael Kimmelman) * Met: VINCENT VAN GOGH: THE DRAWINGS, through Dec. 31. Think again before deciding youve got a case of van Gogh fatigue and skipping this exhibition -- not just because the focus is on drawings, which on the whole are less well-known than the paintings and were so important to the early spread of his reputation, but also because in the flesh, great art, no matter how often it has been dully reproduced or mistaken for a price tag or overrun by crowds, retains its dignity and originality and utter strangeness. Frankly, the whole show, even including the bad drawings, is unforgettable. (See above.) (Kimmelman) * Museum of Modern Art: Beyond the Visible: The Art of Odilon Redon, through Jan. 23. The timing was off for the big Odilon Redon retrospective in Chicago in 1994. The art worlds mind was on identity politics and neo-conceptualism. Fin-de-siĂšcle drawings of moony monsters and lamp-bright flowers existed on some other planet. Now theres another Redon survey, smaller, very beautiful, culminating in his lush, pixilated late paintings. And the timing for it is just right. 11 West 53rd Street, (212) 708-9400. (Cotter) * Museum of Modern Art : ELIZABETH MURRAY, through Jan. 9. Here is the complete range of shape-shifting, dizzily colored pictures that Elizabeth Murray has produced over four decades. The colors are noisy, the harmonies pungent, the scale big and bold. While art-world fashion has drifted here and there, Ms. Murray has stuck to her craft, with all its difficulties and at the occasional cost of failure and neglect. Her show is a meaty, openhearted, eye-popping event. (See above.) (Kimmelman) neue galerie: Egon Schiele: The Ronald S. Lauder and Serge Sabarsky Collections, through Feb. 20. This extensive exhibition mostly of works on paper gives an informative account of the regrettably brief career of one of the 20th centurys great draftsmen and romantic rebels. Schieles self-portraits and drawings and watercolors of sexy young women still burn with fires of narcissistic yearning, erotic desire and bohemian dissent. 1048 Fifth Avenue, (212) 628-6200. (Johnson) * P.S. 1: Peter Hujar, through Jan. 16. When Peter Hujar died in 1987, he was a figure of acute interest to a small group of fans and unknown to practically everyone else. His photographs of desiccated corpses in Sicilian catacombs and studio portraits of New Yorks downtown demi-monde were a gorgeous shock, and their cocktail of Nadar, Weegee and Vogue shaped the work of many younger artists. This surveyish sampling includes several of his recurrent themes: portraits of people and animals, landscapes, still-lifes and erotica. Sensuality and mortality are the binders throughout, inseparable. 22-25 Jackson Avenue, at 46th Street, Long Island City, Queens, (718) 784-2084.(Cotter) * P.S. 1: The Painted World, through Jan. 30. Though this 23-artist exhibition of mostly contemporary abstractionists lacks bite as a whole, every individual painter in it is worthy of attention. In addition to ancestral figures like Myron Stout and Moira Dryer, the show includes Philip Taaffe, Mary Heilmann and Chris Martin. (See above.) (Johnson) * WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART: OSCAR BLUEMNER: A PASSION FOR COLOR, through Feb. 12. Not exactly a well-known name today, except to devotees of American Modernism, this German-born architect-turned-painter (1867-1938) was one of the major American artists of the early 20th century. Most of his compositions are unpeopled landscapes depicting houses and building fragments in brilliantly stylized settings in which trees, clouds, smokestacks, telephone poles, water and snow are rendered as rhythmic and dramatic shapes that play off one another almost musically. 945 Madison Avenue, at 75th Street, (212) 570-3676. (Glueck) * Whitney Museum of American Art: THE ART OF RICHARD TUTTLE, through Feb. 5. For 40 years, Richard Tuttle has murmured the ecstasies of paying close attention to the worlds infinitude of tender incidents, making oddball assemblages of prosaic ephemera, which, at first glance, belie their intense deliberation and rather monumental ambition. Out of cord, tin, Styrofoam, florists wire and bubble wrap he has devised objects whose status is not quite sculpture or drawing or painting but some combination of the three, and whose exquisiteness is akin to that of jewelry. His outstanding retrospective is a cross between a kindergarten playroom and a medieval treasury. (See above) (Kimmelman) Galleries: 57th Street EDWARD MAYER: DRAWING OUT A single work designed for and occupying the entire front exhibition space of this gallery, Drawing Out looks both sturdy and fragile, a skeletal open-work modular passageway 18-feet-long, put together as if from a giant Erector set. At once disciplined architecture and intuitive sculptural drawing, the piece invites you to enter and explore it, while conveying a disturbing sense of matter out of place. How often do you get to view a drawing from the inside out? Zabriskie Gallery, 41 East 57th Street (212) 752-1223, through Dec. 3. (Glueck) TOM WESSELMANN: WORKS ON PAPER, RETROSPECTIVE Typed as a Pop artist early on for his portrayals of commercial foodstuffs as well as of stylized womens bodies (or parts thereof) that mingled classic odalisque and sexy pinup, Tom Wesselmann (1931-2004) had other strings to his bow, among them an interest in landscape and, later in his career, large abstract cutouts in metal. His provocative nude icons are here in abundance, but also evident is his interest in Matisse, Picasso and Mondrian. This lively show of 44 works on paper, arranged by his daughter, Kate, also reveals that Wesselmann was a compulsive draftsman, producing and revising many color and compositional studies for his finished works. Maxwell Davidson Gallery, 724 Fifth Avenue, (212) 759-7555, through Dec. 23. (Glueck) Galleries: Chelsea Mona Hatoum: Mobile Home The playful side of this often politically motivated sculptor prevails. The centerpiece, Mobile Home, is an arrangement of domestic objects strung on fine cables between metal traffic barriers; it takes a moment to realize that the toys, chairs, suitcases and other items are slowly rolling back and forth on tiny wheels. An installation upstairs consists of a circle of slowly pulsing light bulbs plugged into intricately interwoven cables. Alexander and Bonin, 132 10th Avenue, between 18th and 19th Streets, (212) 367-7474, through Dec. 22. (Johnson) James Hayward A veteran Los Angeles-based abstract painter selected for this show by Mike Kelley, Mr. Hayward presents a recent series of single-color paintings made of extremely thick, crisscrossing brush strokes. The optical and tactile combine to exceptionally satisfying effect. Cue, 511 West 25th Street, (212) 206-3583, through Dec. 3. (Johnson) Mel Leipzig A Trenton-based realist who began exhibiting in the mid-1960s, Mr. Leipzig paints affectionate, exhaustively detailed portraits of people in their homes or workplaces with a deliberately unpolished touch. One subject is a man with a shaved head and a goatee relaxing on his living room sofa in the midst of an amazingly extensive collection of sports memorabilia. Henoch, 555 West 25th Street, (917) 305-0003, through Dec. 3. (Johnson) * Ann Lislegaard: Bellona (after Samuel R. Delany) An entrancing animated video based on a famous science-fiction novel tours a mazelike series of empty rooms. Murray Guy, 453 West 17th Street, (212) 463-7372, through Dec. 3. (Johnson) Kim Simonsson Under the influence of Japanese manga cartoons, this Finnish ceramicist makes large, monochromatic sculptures of wide-eyed, otherworldly girls and deer. Nancy Margolis, 523 West 25th Street, (212) 242-3013, through Nov. 26. (Johnson) Other Galleries Hans Hofmann: The Legacy Hofmann was one of the few who made it into the art history hall of fame as both teacher and painter. Along with three works by the master himself, this exhibition presents abstract and semi-abstract paintings by disciples who were either directly taught or deeply influenced by him, including Ludwig Sander, Robert De Niro, Louisa Matthiasdottir and Laurie Fendrich. The Painting Center, 52 Greene Street, SoHo, (212) 343-1060, through Dec. 24. (Johnson) * If Its Too Bad to Be True, It Could Be Disinformation Old-style political art said yes or no, told you what to do. New-style political art, as often as not, obscures its intentions, makes you wonder what its up to and goes for confusion, as in this shrewd, dematerialized group exhibition on the subject of disinformation, a passive form of political deceit that tells lies through the omission of facts. The idea is that the less people know about what their government is doing, the less likely they are to raise a fuss. Apexart, 291 Church Street, TriBeCa, (212) 431-5270, through Nov. 26. (Cotter) * AndrĂ© KertEsz From tiny, wonderfully intense pictures made in the teens in Budapest, where Kertesz was born in 1894, to formally acute views of Paris in the 20s and 30s, to emotionally and metaphorically resonant images of New York, where he lived from 1936 to his death in 1985, this beautiful exhibition covers the career of a giant of 20th-century photography. International Center of Photography, 1133 Avenue of the Americas, at 43rd Street, (212) 857-0000, through Nov. 27. (Johnson) Ray Mortenson: Cedars/Sea and Sky Alternating between the land and sea of Rhode Island, this quietly gripping show of mostly small black-and-white photographs presents soft and misty images of bushy cedars and extraordinarily clear and luminous pictures of ocean waves. Janet Borden, 560 Broadway, at Prince Street, SoHo, (212) 431-0166, through Dec. 4. (Johnson) * THE SPLENDOR OF THE WORD: MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS AT THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY Few objects encapsulate their times like the exquisite full-service concentrations of text, image and decoration that are illuminated manuscripts, and few institutions in North America have as many great ones as New York Citys favorite library. New York Public Library, Fifth Avenue, at 42nd Street, (212) 869-8069, through Feb. 12. (Smith) System in Chaos: New Art Brut From the Czech Republic Four fascinating Czech outsiders: Zdenek Koseks small, congested bubble diagrams chart unfathomable verbal associations; Lubos Plnys expansive, finely detailed drawings offer delirious lessons in human anatomy; Zbynek Semeraks small, delicately busy works on paper convey what seems to be a medieval iconography of religion and architecture; and Leos Wertheimers large drawings portray locomotives with mechanical precision. Cavin-Morris, 560 Broadway, at Prince Street, SoHo, (212) 226-3768, through Nov. 26. (Johnson) Robert Therrien, Table and Six Chairs In a vast corporate atrium stand a table and six chairs that are wholly ordinary-looking except for their gigantic size -- the chair backs rise to almost nine feet, and the top of the table is over six feet. Mr. Therrien transformed his own kitchen furniture into painted metal monuments that make the viewer feel like the protagonist of Jack and the Beanstalk. The Atrium of 590 Madison Avenue, at 56th Street, (212) 980-4575, through Nov. 28. (Johnson) Last Chance Eighth Annual International Juried Botanical Art Exhibition The old-fashioned art of botanical illustration lives on, as evinced by this selection of finely made drawings and watercolors by more than 40 artists. Many are routinely competent, but some, like a small, intense picture of a gnarly root ball by Jean Emmons, are remarkable for both what and how they represent. The Horticultural Society of New York, 128 West 58th Street, (212) 757-0915, closing tomorrow. (Johnson) Landscape: Myth and Memory Miniature ruins built of tiny bricks on rocky landscapes made of clay by Charles Simmonds; large, faux-antique photographs of Egyptian pyramids by Lynn Davis; an enormous, crusty book by Anselm Kiefer open to the photographic image of ancient architectural remains; and archetypal circles painted and photographed by Richard Long all add up to a nicely choreographed collective fantasy about primordial civilizations. Senior & Shopmaker, 21 East 26th Street, (212) 213-6767, closing on Wednesday. (Johnson) PLAIN OF HEAVEN Organized by Creative Time, this show of mostly site-specific installations insinuates a reverberating, poetic Minimalism into the darkened spaces of a former meatpacking plant. The efforts of Corey McCorkle, O. Winston Link, Leandro Erlich, Helen Mirra, Gordon Matta-Clark, William Forsythe and Saskia Olde-Wolbers are noteworthy. A sound piece by Trisha Donnelly will engulf the building for the last 20 minutes of the shows run. 832 Washington Street, at Gansevoort Street, West Village, (212) 206-6674, closing on Sunday. (Smith)

Hugh Jackman posts Valentines Day flashback photo with wife Deborra-Lee.

The image appears to be a photo of a photo, with Happy Valentines scrawled across it, followed by a love-heart handwritten in a gold marker pen over part of the shot. It appears to be a photo of the couple from the late 90s as the pair married in.

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Happy Valentines Day suckers: how Damien Hirsts cashing.

The artists latest show, featuring banal images of love hearts and butterflies, looks like an attempt to squeeze money out of innocent punters.. There is no reason for his latest exhibition except to squeeze a few thousand quid out of punters innocent enough to think a Damien Hirst print makes a cool gift for Valentines Day. For Hirst has joined the desperate high-street shops trying to cash in on lurv, with a series of incredibly banal and basic variations on love hearts��.

Score Valentines Day freebies and special deals

Valentines Day is all about love and, for some, how to show it while spending the least amount of money possible. Here are deals for the romantics. Worlds Largest #StarbucksDate! Friday, February 13th from 2 P.M. to close. pic.twitter.com/Co5HduXNE8.

Hoda has change of heart about Valentines Day

Valentines Day is Saturday, and boy oh boy, Hoda is ready. Her man, Joel, has our pal all figured out ��� and shes got him wrapped around her finger, which helps because hes got the keys to her heart and er, everywhere else. KLG: For somebody like.

Happy Valentines Day 2015 Facebook Whatsapp Quotes | Messages | Images.

The most awaited day for all the love birds around the world is here. Its time for Valentines Day. 14th February, this date is not an ordinary date. It is the day to show your love, your care, your affection, your bond, your feelings towards your.

Check out this years funny Valentines Day JibJab

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Photos: Happy Valentines Day | WQAD.com

For some Valentines Day is a day to show your sweetheart how much you love them, others see it as a time to get some great candy. And some people just see it as another day. What do you do? Do you decorate your home,��.

How the Obamas Have Celebrated Valentines Day

Saturday marks the second-to-last Valentines Day that the Obamas will spend as the first couple, but a review of their past celebrations show that they tend to keep the holiday low-key. From spending. #HappyValentinesDay -mo pic.twitter.com/lEZdizGhSj.

Happy Valentines Day messages for him: Top 20 Valentine.

Valentines Day brings with it the madness of love. For all the people waiting for this day, get ready to woo your partner with loads of love and attention. When it comes to Valentines Day, the emotion of love being expressed is��.

Kiss Day Wallpaper, Images, SMS, Quotes, Messages, Status

So the closest day of valentines week, Happy Kiss Day 2015 is here. And we are back with the best Kiss Day wallpapers, HD photos and pics for free download, also showing you the Kiss Day SMS, Quotes, Messages��.

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY IMAGES to Post on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

Love is in the air and what better way to share it than with images? V-Day is all about showing that special someone how you really feel and helping others do the same. Social media is an excellent platform to do so we have compiled some of the best.

Valentines Day Quotes, SMS, Images, Wallpaper, Messages, Pics | Happy.

Finally the day has come for which we all were waiting for. Yes, we are talking about Happy Valentines Day 2015, a day to celebrate joy of love and happiness with the people we love the most. This years Valentines Day is very special considering the.

Happy Valentines Day 2015: Best Valentine Day SMS.

Largely, it depends on the perception of Valentine Days ���some introverts to express their innermost feelings openly while others will treat their partners with the same devotion and love like they do through the year.. On Valentine Day, lovers try and send precious gifts to each other, which reflect their bond of love and affection towards each other. Valentine Day helps in making relationships much stronger. Image Credit: Jyoti Desale. Modified Date: February 13,��.

Valentines Day 2015 vintage photos: classic Cleveland couples (tbt, photos)

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- On St. Valentines Day, we take a sentimental journey viewing memorable local pairings throughout our history. We have power couples, who made a mark in business, politics or philanthropy. Maybe how they dress, or something they .

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Its Valentines Day tomorrow, and I will be spending it as usual in a bath of ewes milk shared with my wife, in a candlelit room, drinking champagne and gazing into the deep pools of each others shining eyes as we contemplate our mutual awesomeness.

Guy and Jules Sebastian celebrate seventh Valentines Day as a married couple

Romance was certainly in the air on Saturday for Guy and Jules Sebastian, as the pair celebrated their seventh Valentines Day as a married couple. Taking to Instagram, 33-year-old Australian singer Guy shared a sweet snap of the pair enjoying a tender.

Valentines Day 2015: Funny Quotes, Best Quips For Him, Her And Friends.

Or, as men like to call it, Extortion Day.��� -- Jay Leno. 3. Men always want to be a womans first love -- women like to be a mans last romance. -- Oscar Wilde. 4. ���I wanted to make it really special on Valentines Day, so I tied my boyfriend up. And.

Happy Valentines Day 2015: All you need to know about.

But like we said Valentines Day is not just restricted to couples any more. So enjoy it with your friends/siblings/parents! Happy Valentine Day 2015! Imaging: Facebook|Edited by Shweta Parande. Modified Date: February 13,��.

Happy Valentines Day 2015: Top 20 romantic Shayaris to.

Send top romantic Hindi shayaris to send your loved one on February 14 on Valentines Day.

This Valentines Day, Im Loving The Boyfriend I Built For Myself

Have your parents ever asked you if youre dating someone, and just to get out of the situation, you lie and say, Yes, I am. His name is Rick Jagger? No? Really? Me neither. But one new company is betting that many people do feel very awkward about .

The Listings: July 15 -- July 21

Theater Approximate running times are in parentheses. Full reviews of current shows, additional listings, showtimes and tickets: nytimes.com/theater. Previews and Openings AMERICAN LIVING ROOM FESTIVAL Opens Wednesday. One of the more unpredictable summer festivals presents new and multidisciplinary work. This years theme is Carousel of Progress. Here Arts Center, 145 Avenue of the Americas, (212)868-4444. THE BLONDE IN THE THUNDERBIRD Opens Sunday. Suzanne Somers, star of Threes Company, bares her soul in this one-woman show about her life. Be nice. (1:30). Brooks Atkinson Theater, 256 West 47th Street, (212)307-4100. EAST TO EDINBURGH FESTIVAL Through July 31. A mix of fringe-style shows that include A Clockwork Orange and The Booth Variations. 59E59 Theaters, 59 East 59th Street (212)279-4200. LENNON Opens Aug. 4. Latest jukebox musical (with a Yoko approved biographical story of the beloved singer) boasts three rare and unpublished tunes to go with all your old favorites (2:10). Broadhurst Theater, 235 44th Street, (212)239-6200. LINCOLN CENTER FESTIVAL 2005 The chic-est festival of the summer puts a premium on cultural crosspollination. Among its offerings are the New York artist Robert Wilsons version of an Indonesian creation myth, I La Galigo; a show about the life and work of the Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen, created by Stephin Merritt, an American musician, and Chen Shi-Zheng, a Chinese director (and, incidentally, starring an Irish actress, Fiona Shaw); and the French master Ariane Mnouchkines epic spectacle about Iranian and Kurdish refugees. Through July 31. Venues in and around Lincoln Center (212)721-6500. OEDIPUS AT PALM SPRINGS Previews start Wednesday. Opens August 3. What hath gay marriage wrought? Find out in the Five Lesbian Brotherss comic spin on Greek tragedy, which they are calling the feel weird lesbian tragicomedy of the year. (1:30). New York Theater Workshop, 79 East Fourth Street (212)460-5475. PHILADELPHIA, HERE I COME Opens Thursday. Brian Friels first play to receive major attention is a bittersweet comedy about a down-on-his-luck Irishman (is there any other kind in the theater?) reflecting on his life before he moves to the States (2:00) Irish Repertory Theater, 132 West 22nd Street, (212)727-2737. Broadway ALL SHOOK UP In a pint-size theater with a campy young cast, All Shook Up might be a moderate hoot. Inflated to Broadway proportions, its a mind-numbing holler (2:10). Palace Theater, 1564 Broadway, at 47th Street, (212)307-4100.(Ben Brantley) CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG The playthings are the thing in this lavish windup music box of a show: windmills, Rube Goldberg-like machines and the shows title character, a flying car. Its like spending two and a half hours in the Times Square branch of Toys R Us (2:30). Hilton Theater, 213 West 42nd Street, (212)307-4100. (Brantley) THE CONSTANT WIFE A stylish production of a creaky 1926 comedy by W. Somerset Maugham. Kate Burton stars as a well-heeled English wife who scarcely raises an eyebrow at her husbands philandering, scandalizing her friends. Maughams dialogue isnt quite as witty as the brisk Ms. Burton and Lynn Redgrave, who plays her imperious mother, manage to make it sound (2:15). American Airlines Theater, 227 West 42nd Street, Manhattan, (212)719-1300. (Charles Isherwood) DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS On paper, this tale of two mismatched scam artists has an awful lot in common with The Producers. But if you are going to court comparison with giants, you had better be prepared to stand tall. Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, starring John Lithgow and Norbert Leo Butz, never straightens out of a slouch (2:35). Imperial, 249 West 45th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) *DOUBT, A PARABLE (Pulitzer Prize, Best Play 2005 and Tony Award, Best Play 2005) Set in the Bronx in 1964, this play by John Patrick Shanley is structured as a clash of wills and generations between Sister Aloysius (Cherry Jones), the head of a parochial school, and Father Flynn (Brian F. OByrne), the young priest who may or may not be too fond of the boys in his charge. The plays elements bring to mind those tidy topical melodramas that were once so popular. But Mr. Shanley makes subversive use of musty conventions (1:30). Walter Kerr, 219 West 48th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) FIDDLER ON THE ROOF From the moment it sounds its first word in this placid revival, the voice of Harvey Fierstein (who has replaced Alfred Molina in the central role of Tevye) makes the audience prick up its ears. Whether that voice fits comfortably into the Russian village of Anatevka is another issue. But at least it brings a bit of zest to this abidingly bland production (2:55). Minskoff, 200 West 45th Street, (212)307-4100.(Brantley) * GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS (Tony Award, Best Play Revival 2005) Highly caffeinated bliss. Watching Joe Mantellos hopping revival of David Mamets play about a dog-eat-dog real estate office is like having espresso pumped directly into your bloodstream. But whats a little lost sleep when youve had the chance to see a dream-team ensemble, including Liev Schrieber and Alan Alda, pitching fast-ball Mamet dialogue with such pure love for the athletics of acting (1:50) Bernard B. Jacobs Theater, 242 West 45th Street, (212)239-6200.(Brantley) JACKIE MASON: FRESHLY SQUEEZED Jackie Mason has so cunningly manufactured and marketed his dyspeptic comic persona -- the herky-jerky movements used to embellish the routines, the voice thats like a sinus infection with a bad back -- that he may soon be able to refine all actual jokes out of his act, and still slay em. Thats chutzpah. And quite a talent, too (2:05). Hayes, 240 West 44th Street, (212)239-6200. (Isherwood) LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA Love is a many-flavored thing, from sugary to sour, in Adam Guettel and Craig Lucass encouragingly ambitious and discouragingly unfulfilled new musical. The show soars only in the sweetly bitter songs performed by the wonderful Victoria Clark, as an American abroad (2:15). Beaumont, Lincoln Center, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) *THE PILLOWMAN For all its darkness of plot and imagery, Martin McDonaghs tale of a suspected child murderer in a totalitarian state dazzles with a brightness now largely absent from Broadway. Exquisitely directed and designed, The Pillowman features top-of-the-line performances from Billy Crudup, Jeff Goldblum, Zeljko Ivanek and Michael Stuhlbarg (2:40). Booth, 222 West 45th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) *PRIMO In his crystalline adaptation of If This Is a Man, Primo Levis memoir of the Holocaust, Antony Sher creates a portrait in which brutal memory penetrates the very marrow of existence. His great accomplishment is in doing so in an expressly theatrical language that never sensationalizes, lectures or begs for pity (1:30). Music Box Theater, 239 West 45th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) SPAMALOT (Tony Award, Best Musical 2005) This staged re-creation of the mock-medieval movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail is basically a singing scrapbook for Python fans. Still, it seems safe to say that such a good time is being had by so many people that this fitful, eager celebration of inanity and irreverence will find a large and lucrative audience (2:20). Shubert, 225 West 44th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) STEEL MAGNOLIAS Despite an ensemble featuring high-profile veterans of stage, film and television, sitting through this portrait of friendship among Southern women, set in a beauty parlor in small-town Louisiana, is like watching nail polish dry (2:20). Lyceum, 149 West 45th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) SWEET CHARITY This revival of the 1966 musical, directed by Walter Bobbie and choreographed by Wayne Cilento, never achieves more than a low-grade fever when whats wanted is that old steam heat. In the title role of the hopeful dance hall hostess, the appealing but underequipped Christina Applegate is less a shopworn angel than a merry cherub (2:30). Al Hirschfeld Theater, 302 West 45th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) *THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE The happy news for this happy-making little musical is that the move to larger quarters has dissipated none of its quirky charm. William Finns score sounds plumper and more rewarding than it did Off Broadway, providing a sprinkling of sugar to complement the sass in Rachel Sheinkins zinger-filled book. The performances are flawless. Gold stars all around. (1:45). Circle in the Square, 1633 Broadway, at 50th Street, (212)239-6200. (Isherwood) *WHOS AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? Everybody ultimately loses in Edward Albees great marital wrestling match of a play from 1962. But theatergoers who attend this revealingly acted new production, starring a superb Kathleen Turner and Bill Irwin, are destined to leave the Longacre feeling like winners (2:50). Longacre Theater, 220 West 48th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) Off Broadway *ALTAR BOYZ This sweetly satirical show about a Christian pop group made up of five potential Teen People cover boys is an enjoyable, silly diversion (1:30). Dodger Stages Stage 4, 340 West 50th Street, Clinton, (212)239-6200.(Isherwood) BEAST ON THE MOON Richard Kalinoskis musty romantic drama depicts the fractious marriage of two survivors of the genocide of Armenians during World War I. Larry Mosss production is respectable and effective, but the performances by Omar Metwally and Lena Georgas are exhaustingly busy (2:00). Century Center for the Performing Arts, 111 East 15th Street, Flatiron district, (212)239-6200. (Isherwood) BOOCOCKS HOUSE OF BASEBALL Paul Boocock finds beauty in great moments from New York Yankee history, and he hates President Bush, but his attempt to merge these two preoccupations into a one-man show is as lame and listless as the 2005 Yankee pitching staff. (1:00). Flea Theater, 41 White Street, Lower Manhattan, (212)352-3101.(Neil Genzlinger). * BORDER/CLASH: A LITANY OF DESIRES With razor-sharp cheekbones and two voluminous puffs of hair resting on top of a delicate wisp of a body, Staceyann Chin, the author and star of this new autobiographical solo show, is a caricaturists dream. Her appealing if not terribly original show follows her from a tumultuous childhood in Jamaica to New York City, where she starred on Broadway in Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam. (1:30). The Culture Project, 45 Bleecker Street, Greenwich Village, (212)307-4100. (Jason Zinoman) DRIVING ON THE LEFT SIDE Its called a reggae play, and the band Reggaelution is one of the best things about this story of an American womans fling with a Jamaican musician (watched by her father and his mother). Unfortunately, an actor plays the lead musician, which blunts the impact both of the band and of this too-pat play, which goes for laugh lines at the expense of credibility. (2:30). TBG Theater, 312 West 36th Street, garment district, (212)868-4444.(Anne Midgette) DRUMSTRUCK The noisy novelty at Dodger Stages, is a mixed blessing. Providing theatergoers a two-foot drum on every seat, it offers an opportunity to exorcise aggressions by delivering a good beating; and on a slightly more elevated level, it presents a superficial introduction to African culture, lessons in drumming and 90 minutes of nonstop music, song and dancing by a good-natured cast. So, while literally and figuratively giving off many good vibes, it adds up to lightweight entertainment that stops just short of pulverizing the eardrums (1:30). Dodgers Stages, 340 West 50th Street, Clinton, (212)239-6200.(Lawrence Van Gelder) * FORBIDDEN BROADWAY: SPECIAL VICTIMS UNIT This production features the expected caricatures of ego-driven singing stars. But even more than usual, the show offers an acute list of grievances about the sickly state of the Broadway musical, where, as the lyrics have it, everything old is old again (1:45). 47th Street Theater, 304 West 47th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) LAZER VAUDEVILLE If this isnt an ancient showbiz rule, it ought to be: things will look a lot more impressive if they are done in the dark with a heavy dose of fluorescence. That seems to be the guiding principle behind this hodgepodge of juggling, rope twirling and such, delivered wordlessly by the cast (1:30). Lambs Theater, 130 West 44th Street, Midtown, (212)239-6200. (Genzlinger) MANUSCRIPT Three talented, attractive young actors and some skillfully shaggy dialogue are the only reasons to see Paul Grellongs inconsequential play, a revenge tale centering on the theft of an unpublished manuscript expected to be of great literary merit. Implausibility is a big problem: there are plot holes here you could easily drive a hardback copy of Infinite Jest through (1:30). Daryl Roth Theater, 101 East 15th Street, Flatiron district, (212)239-6200. (Isherwood) THE MUSICAL OF MUSICALS! The musical is the happy narcissist of theater; parody is the best form of narcissism. All it needs are smart writers and winning performers. Thats what we get in this case (1:30). Dodger Stages, Stage 5, 340 West 50th Street, Clinton, (212)239-6200. (Margo Jefferson) *ORSONS SHADOW Austin Pendletons play, about a 1960 production of Ionescos Rhinoceros directed by Orson Welles and starring Laurence Olivier, is a sharp-witted but tenderhearted backstage comedy about the thin skins, inflamed nerves and rampaging egos that are the customary side effects when sensitivity meets success (2:00). Barrow Street Theater, 27 Barrow Street, Greenwich Village, (212)239-6200. (Isherwood) THE PARIS LETTER Jon Robin Baitzs ambitious but schematic play is a morality tale about a misspent life and the dangers of sexual repression. Cleanly directed by Doug Hughes, it features a pair of excellent performances by the superb actors John Glover and Ron Rifkin. But Mr. Baitz gets himself trapped in the mechanical working of an overcomplicated plot (2:00). Roundabout Theater Company, at the Laura Pels Theater, 111 West 46th Street, Midtown, (212)719-1300.(Isherwood) THE SKIN GAME A powerful performance by James Gale propels the Mint Theaters revival of The Skin Game. The Nobel Prize laureate John Galsworthys drama about two English families whose differences escalate into destructive conflict provides provocative and entertaining theater. (2:20) Mint Theater, 311 West 43rd Street, (212)315-0231. (Van Gelder) SLAVAS SNOWSHOW Clowns chosen by the Russian master Slava Polunin are stirring up laughter and enjoyment. A show that touches the heart as well as tickles the funny bone (1:30). Union Square Theater, 100 East 17th Street, (212)307-4100. (Van Gelder) *THOM PAIN (BASED ON NOTHING) Is there such a thing as stand-up existentialism? If not, Will Eno has just invented it. Stand-up-style comic riffs and deadpan hipster banter keep interrupting the corrosively bleak narrative. Mr. Eno is a Samuel Beckett for the Jon Stewart generation (1:10). DR2 Theater, 103 East 15th Street, Flatiron district, (212)239-6200. (Isherwood) TWELFTH NIGHT Just because the Aquila Theaters broad, crowd-pleasing interpretation lacks subtlety doesnt mean that its not effective, in its way. Even if the costumes are a bit too cute -- are the oversize codpieces really necessary? -- the design is crisp and nicely realized, and the performances have more verve and clarity than most summer Shakespeare productions (2:15). Baruch Performing Arts Center, 25th Street between Lexington and Third Avenues, (212)279-4200. (Zinoman) Off Off Broadway TOP TEN Peter Gil-Sheridans Top Ten is a paint-by-the-numbers series of stereotypes. The cardboard characters and predictable permutations are, in fact, actually numbered. Each vignette is presented as a sort of plot equation that never really adds up. This two-hours plus theatrical lottery may soon make you feel in need of a remedial math course. Top Ten is even less than the sum of its parts. Sanford Meisner Theater, 164 11th Avenue, near 22nd Street, (212)868-4444. (Phoebe Hoban) SCREEN PLAY A.R. Gurneys gleefully partisan retooling of the film Casablanca sets one tough saloon owners battle between idealism and cynicism in Buffalo in the 21st century. Staged by Jim Simpson as a deftly orchestrated reading, Screen Play turns out to be more than a quick collegiate caper; its a morally indignant work that fights frivolity with frivolity (1:10). Flea Theater, 41 White Street, TriBeCa, (212)352-3101.(Brantley) Long-Running Shows BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Cartoon made flesh -- sort of (2:30). Lunt-Fontanne Theater, 205 West 46th Street, Manhattan, (212)307-4747. (Brantley) BLUE MAN GROUP Conceptual art as family entertainment (1:45). Astor Place Theater, 434 Lafayette Street, East Village, (212)254-4370. (Brantley) CHICAGO Irrefutable proof that crime pays (2:25). Ambassador, 219 West 49th Street, Manhattan, (212)239-6200.(Brantley) HAIRSPRAY Fizzy pop, cute kids, large man in a housedress (2:30). Neil Simon Theater, 250 West 52nd Street, Manhattan, (212)307-4100. (Brantley) THE LION KING Disney on safari, where the big bucks roam (2:45). New Amsterdam Theater, 214 West 42nd Street, Manhattan, (212)307-4100. (Brantley) MAMMA MIA! The jukebox that devoured Broadway (2:20). Cadillac Winter Garden Theater, 1634 Broadway, at 50th Street, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) MOVIN OUT The miracle dance musical that makes Billy Joel cool (2:00). Richard Rodgers Theater, 226 West 46th Street, Manhattan, (212)307-4100.(Brantley) NAKED BOYS SINGING Thats who they are. Thats what they do (1:05). Julia Miles Theater, 414 West 55th Street, Clinton, (212)239-6200. (Anita Gates) THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA Who was that masked man, anyway? (2:30). Majestic Theater, 247 West 44th Street, Manhattan, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) THE PRODUCERS The ne plus ultra of showbiz scams (2:45). St. James Theater, 246 West 44th Street, Manhattan, (212)239-6200. (Brantley) RENT East Village angst and love songs to die for (2:45). Nederlander Theater, 208 West 41st Street, Manhattan, (212)307-4100. (Brantley) STOMP And the beat goes on (and on), with percussion unlimited (1:30). Orpheum Theater, Second Avenue at Eighth Street, East Village, (212)477-2477. (Brantley) Last Chance AS YOU LIKE IT Thanks to Brian Bedford, the gloomy philosopher Jaques is the primary source of joy in Mark Lamos wobbly production of Shakespeares pastoral comedy in Central Park. Whenever Mr. Bedfords Jaques is center stage, spreading skepticism among the plays spirited lovers, the sun comes out, at least in aesthetic terms. When he retreats to the fringes, clouds of mediocrity gather with alarming speed, although Lynn Collins is a warm and likable Rosalind. Delacorte Theater in Central Park. Entrances at 81st Street and Central Park West and at 79th Street at Fifth Avenue, (212)539-8750, closing Sunday. (Isherwood) BIRDIE BLUE The stern competence of Lieutenant Van Buren, the formidable figure played by S. Epatha Merkerson on Law & Order, is a long way from the warm but addled Birdie Blue, the title character in the new play by Cheryl L. West at the Second Stage Theater. The gifted Ms. Merkerson has no trouble bridging that emotional distance, but theres little she can do to patch the dramatic holes in Ms. Wests fragmentary, seriously unsatisfactory play. (1:30). Second Stage Theater, 307 West 43rd Street, Clinton, (212)246-4422, closes Sunday. (Isherwood) *SWIMMING IN THE SHALLOWS Can man-shark love survive in the post- Jaws era? Adam Bocks screwy, perfectly cast play poses this and other questions you didnt know needed asking, in hilarious fashion. (1:20). McGinn/Cazale Theater, 2162 Broadway, at 76th Street, fourth floor, (212)246-4422, closes Sunday. (Genzlinger) Movies Ratings and running times are in parentheses; foreign films have English subtitles. Full reviews of all current releases, movie trailers, showtimes and tickets: nytimes.com/movies. THE ADVENTURES OF SHARKBOY AND LAVAGIRL IN 3-D (PG, 94 minutes) Theres a reason that children arent allowed to vote, drive or make movies with multimillion-dollar budgets. Lively and imaginative as their inner worlds may be, the very young still lack the discipline and maturity to shape their dream worlds into coherent and compelling stories -- a task the director Robert Rodriguez (El Mariachi, Sin City) also fails to accomplish in this muddled quest narrative based on characters and themes created by his 7-year-old son, Racer Max. (Dana Stevens) *BATMAN BEGINS (PG-13, 137 minutes) Conceived in the shadow of American pop rather than in its bright light, this tense, effective iteration of Bob Kanes original comic book owes its power and pleasures to a director (Christopher Nolan) who takes his material seriously and to a star (a terrific Christian Bale) who shoulders that seriousness with ease. Batman Begins is the seventh live-action film to take on the comic-book legend and the first to usher it into the kingdom of movie myth. (Manohla Dargis) *THE BEAT THAT MY HEART SKIPPED (No rating, 107 minutes) This electrifying French film is the story of an enforcer and would-be concert pianist that hinges on the struggle between the two sides of the male animal, the beauty and the beast. For the adult moviegoer, the film is a well-timed gift; its also essential viewing. (Dargis) THE BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY (R, 125 minutes, in English and Vietnamese) A young man leaves Vietnam hoping to find his father, an American soldier. Earnest and sometimes clumsy, but also affecting. (A.O. Scott) BEWITCHED (PG-13, 90 minutes) Nicole Kidman stars as a real nose-twitching witch cast in a sitcom redo of Bewitched. The movie is agreeably watchable for an hour, so its too bad that the director Nora Ephron forgot that a gimmick is no substitute for a screenplay, never mind a real movie. (Dargis) * CATERINA IN THE BIG CITY (No rating, 106 minutes, in Italian) In this contemporary political allegory from Italy, a disgruntled teacher and his family move from the country to Rome, where his 12-year-old daughter finds herself the object of a furious tug of war between two cliques, one left wing and bohemian, the other right wing and materialist. Bold, richly textured and entertaining.(Stephen Holden) CINDERELLA MAN (PG-13, 144 minutes) The best parts of Ron Howards ingratiating, Depression-era weepie about the boxing underdog-turned-topdog James J. Braddock are, unsurprisingly, Russell Crowe and Paul Giamatti, actors who could steal a movie from a basket of mewling kittens and an army of rosy-cheeked orphans. RenĂ©e Zellweger also stars. (Dargis) CRÓNICAS (R, 98 minutes, in Spanish and English) John Leguizamo is an ambitious, unscrupulous Miami reporter for a tabloid television show on the track of a serial murderer of children in an Ecuadorian village. (Holden) DARK WATER (PG-13, 104 minutes) Make that dark, stagnant water.(Dargis) A DECENT FACTORY (No rating, 79 minutes, in English, Finnish and Chinese) A cursory, irritatingly facile look at the human cost of globalization, this documentary film was shot and directed by a Frenchman, Thomas BalmĂšs, who tagged along with representatives of the Finnish cellphone giant Nokia on a trip to one of the companys suppliers in China. (Dargis) *ENRON: THE SMARTEST GUYS IN THE ROOM (Not rated, 110 minutes) This sober, informative chronicle of the biggest business scandal of the decade is almost indecently entertaining, partly because it offers some of the most satisfying movie villains in quite some time. Recommended for everyone except those likely to be in the Kenneth L. Lay and Jeffrey K. Skilling jury pools. (Scott) THE FANTASTIC FOUR (PG-13, 105 minutes) Mediocre at best. (Scott) 5x2 (R, 90 minutes, in French) A couples relationship unravels backward, from divorce through the birth of their child to their first meeting. Interesting, but chilly. (Scott) *GEORGE A. ROMEROS LAND OF THE DEAD (R, 94 minutes) An excellent freakout of a movie in which the living and the zombies alternate between their roles as hunters and hunted. The twist here is that as the walking dead have grown progressively more human, the living have slowly lost touch with their humanity. You wont go home hungry.(Dargis) HERBIE: FULLY LOADED (G, 95 minutes) Herbie: Fully Loaded is a perfectly silly movie for a silly season that in recent years has forgotten how to be THIS silly. Lindsay Lohan, who combines a tomboyish spunk with a sexy, head-turning strut gives it a charismatic star boost. (Holden) * THE HITCHHIKERS GUIDE TO THE GALAXY (PG, 103 minutes) In this hugely likable, long-awaited film of Douglas Adamss beloved book, the world comes to an end not just with a bang, but also with something of a shrug. Nicely directed with heart and sincerity by the newcomer Garth Jennings, the film features Martin Freeman, a sensational Sam Rockwell and some gloriously singing dolphins. (Dargis) THE HONEYMOONERS (PG-13, 90 minutes) Not the greatest, baby, but not as bad as it might have been. (Scott) *HOWLS MOVING CASTLE (PG, 118 minutes) The latest animated enchantment from Hayao Miyazaki. Lovely to look at, full of heart and mystery. ( Scott) KICKING AND SCREAMING (PG, 90 minutes) A so-so family sports comedy with Will Ferrell acting goofy, and Robert Duvall (as the father of Mr. Ferrells character and a rival youth soccer coach) parodying his performance in The Great Santini. The story follows a venerable Hollywood formula: its lesson is that winning isnt everything, but of course once you learn this lesson, youll win big, anyway. (Scott) LADIES IN LAVENDER (PG-13, 104 minutes) Two dames of the British empire (Judi Dench and Maggie Smith) inhabit spinster sisters in Cornwall who nurse a handsome Polish violinist back to health in 1936. Amiably bogus. (Holden) LAYER CAKE (R, 104 minutes) Directed by Matthew Vaughn, making a smoothly assured debut, and written by J.J. Connolly, this is the newest in British gangland entertainment and the tastiest in years. The star of this show is the very good British actor Daniel Craig, who slices through Layer Cake like a knife. (Dargis) LILA SAYS (No rating, 89 minutes, in French) Ziad Douieris film, about a 16-year-old French girls provocative verbal seduction of a 19-year-old Arab boy takes the raw material of social realist melodrama and turns it into a sad and sexy pop song. (Scott) MADAGASCAR (PG, 86 minutes) Like many computer-animated features, this one, about four celebrity-voiced animals exiled from the Central Park Zoo, expends most of its imaginative resources on clever visuals. These, in the end, are not enough to compensate for the lack of interesting narrative, real characters or jokes on subjects other than flatulence, excrement and contemporary pop culture. (Scott) MAD HOT BALLROOM (PG, 105 minutes) This documentary follows fifth graders from three very different New York City public schools as they prepare to compete in a ballroom dancing tournament. The sight of 10-year-olds trying to master the graceful, grown-up motions of the fox trot and the tango is charming, and the glimpses of their lives in and outside of school are fascinating, though unfortunately the film offers little more than glimpses. (Scott) *MARCH OF THE PENGUINS (G, 80 minutes) This sentimental but riveting documentary follows the one-year mating cycle of emperor penguins in Antarctica when they leave the ocean and march inland to breed and lay eggs. Narrated by Morgan Freeman, the film has no qualms about playing on our emotions. (Holden) MR. AND MRS. SMITH (PG-13, 112 minutes) What counts in a movie like this are stars so dazzling that we wont really notice or at least mind the cut-rate writing (from Simon Kinberg) and occasionally incoherent action (from the director Doug Liman). Sometimes Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie succeed in their mutual role as sucker bait, sometimes they dont, which is why their new joint venture is alternately a goof and a drag. (Dargis) MODIGLIANI (R, 128 minutes) In every particular, the screen biography of the Italian painter and sculptor offers a case study of how not to film the life of a famous artist. Andy Garcias wooden lead performance leads its list of the movies sins against art history. (Holden) MONSTER-IN-LAW (PG-13, 102 minutes) Jane Fonda finds a zany, good-natured verve in a dragon-lady caricature that mirrors a comedy so desperate to avoid offending that it runs in panic from every issue it brings up but refuses to address. (Holden) *MURDERBALL (R, 86 minutes) The brutal, highly competitive sport of wheelchair rugby is the subject of the exciting and uplifting (but never mawkish) documentary about the redemptive power of fierce athletic competition. (Holden) *MYSTERIOUS SKIN (Not rated, 99 minutes) Gregg Araki, onetime bad boy of the New Queer Cinema, has made a heartbreaking and surpassingly beautiful film out of Scott Heims clear-eyed novel about two Kansas boys dealing with the consequences of their sexual abuse by a Little League coach. Superb performances, especially by Joseph Gordon-Levitt. (Scott) *RIZE (PG-13, 85 minutes) A documentary about clowners and krumpers -- that is, fiercely athletic hip-hop dancers battling in (and with) the streets of Los Angeles. Kinetic and inspiring (Scott) * SARABAND (R, 107, in Swedish) Ingmar Bergman has called his bleak, unbendingly severe made-for-television epilogue to Scenes From a Marriage, his final statement on film. As you watch his swan song, which stars Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson as the embattled ex-spouses, you feel the crushing weight of time pressing in around them. (Holden) THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVELING PANTS (PG, 119 minutes) On a shopping trip, four teenage girls find a pair of thrift-store jeans that mysteriously flatters all four of them, despite their differing shapes and sizes. Deciding the jeans must be magic, they make a pact to share them for the summer, wearing them for a week apiece and then mailing them to the next friend. Like the four girls at its center, this fresh-scrubbed, eager-to-please film makes up in charm for what it lacks in sophistication. (Stevens) *STAR WARS: EPISODE III -- REVENGE OF THE SITH (PG-13, 142 minutes) George Lucas saved the best -- or at least one of the best -- for the end. Or for the middle. In any case, the saga is now complete, and has regained much of its original glory. (Scott) STEVE + SKY (No rating, 97 minutes, in Flemish Dutch) The feature film debut of the 26-year-old Flemish filmmaker Felix van Groeningen, Steve + Sky is the story of how Steve (Titus de Voogdt), a scruffy small-time hoodlum just released from jail, falls for Sky (Delfine Bafort), a naĂŻve young prostitute trying to get out of the life. With its deliberately washed-out color palette, affectless dialogue and nearly event-free storyline, Steve + Sky is a mere slip of a movie, a wan character study of people who add up to little more than a series of studied quirks. (Stevens) *TROPICAL MALADY (No rating, 118 minutes, in Thai) Perched between two worlds, two consciousnesses and two radically different storytelling traditions, this Thai feature shows the young filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul pushing at the limits of cinematic narrative with grace and a certain amount of puckish willfulness. (Dargis) WAR OF THE WORLDS (PG-13, 117 minutes) The aliens invade (again). Effectively scary and visually impressive. (Scott) * THE WORLD (No rating, 133 minutes, in Mandarin) Globalization and its discontents form the molten core of The World, Jia Zhangkes fictionalized look at life inside a Disney-like entertainment park in China. This quietly despairing vision comes equipped with an ethnographic attention to detail, glints of surreal comedy and a scaled-down replica of the twin towers. (Dargis) Film Series AFTER VIGO (through July 28) When Jean Vigo died (in 1934 at age 29), he had made only one full-length feature film. This festival pays tribute to Vigos work and to films directly influenced by him, including Frederick Wisemans High School (1968), considered a parallel to Zero in Conduct, on Monday; and Á Propos de Nice, la Suite (1995), a compendium of shorts, on Tuesday. BAM Rose Cinemas, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Fort Greene, Brooklyn, (718)777-FILM or (718)636-4100, $10. (Anita Gates) THE BECK MOVIES (through July 27). The American-Scandinavian Foundation is screening four more of these made-for-Swedish-television movies on consecutive Wednesdays. Peter Haber plays Detective Martin Beck and Mikael Persbrandt is his police-department partner, Gunvald Larsson, who has on-the-job problems relating to women. In Beck: The Recluse, they investigate the deaths of an elderly man on the island of Vanso and a young woman in Stockholm. In Beck: Sender Unknown, the victim is an accountant booked on a flight to Malaysia. Scandinavia House, 58 Park Avenue, between 37th and 38th Streets, (212)879-9779. $8. (Gates) ERNST LUBITSCH FILM FESTIVAL (through Aug. 6) Makor, a program of the 92nd Street Y, is screening five films by Lubitsch (1892-1947) on consecutive Saturdays. Tomorrows feature is Bluebeards Eighth Wife, the 1938 comedy about a battle of the sexes, starring Gary Cooper and Claudette Colbert. 35 West 67th Street, (212)601-1000, $9. (Gates) HISTORIC HARLEM PARKS FILM FESTIVAL (through July 28). This festival of free outdoor screenings continues on Wednesday night with Marcel Camuss Orfeu Negro/Black Orpheus (1959), set at Carnival in Rio de Janeiro. On Thursday night, the film is Sweet Honey in the Rock (2005), Stanley Nelsons documentary about the a cappella singing group. St. Nicholas Park, (212)360-3326. Free. (Gates) IN DEPPTH (through July 31) BAM Cinematek honors Johnny Depp with an 11-film, three-week retrospective, continuing tonight with Mike Newells Donnie Brasco (1997) in which Mr. Depp plays an undercover F.B.I. agent. The weekends other features are Ed Wood (1994), Tim Burtons portrait of a very bad filmmaker, and Arizona Dream (1993), Emir Kusturicas absurdist comedy. BAM Rose Cinemas, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Fort Greene, Brooklyn, (718)777-FILM or (718)636-4100, $10. (Gates) PARAMOUNT BEFORE THE CODE (through Thursday). At Film Forums four-week series, focusing on the era before Production Code censorship was imposed, the weekend screenings include The Story of Temple Drake (1933), a Faulkner adaptation starring Miriam Hopkins; Rouben Mamalians Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), both today and tomorrow; and Monkey Business (1931), the Marx Brothers comedy, set on an ocean liner, on Sunday and Monday. 209 West Houston Street, South Village, (212)727-8110, $10. (Two movies for one admission.) (Gates) RAOUL WALSH RETROSPECTIVE (through Aug. 14). The Museum of the Moving Images 23-film tribute to Walsh (1887-1980) continues tomorrow with two silents, The Thief of Bagdad (1924), starring Douglas Fairbanks and Anna May Wong, and Sadie Thompson (1928), with Gloria Swanson and Lionel Barrymore. Sundays feature is Going Hollywood (1933), with Marion Davies and Bing Crosby. 35th Avenue at 36th Street, Astoria, Queens, (718)784-0077, $10. (Gates) RISKS AND REINVENTION: THE CINEMA OF LOUIS MALLE (through Tuesday). The Film Society of Lincoln Centers retrospective of Louis Malles (1932-95) work concludes Monday and Tuesday with Damage (1992) and Vanya on 42nd Street (1994). This weekends features include Au Revoir les Enfants (1987), which won seven CĂ©sars, including best film, tomorrow; and May Fools (1989), set during the 1968 student protests, tomorrow and Sunday. Walter Reade Theater, Lincoln Center, (212)875-5600, $10. (Gates) Pop Full reviews of recent concerts: nytimes.com/music. JUAN ATKINS (Tomorrow) This electronic-music pioneer is enjoying an unexpected run on the pop charts thanks to Missy Elliott, whose hit single Lose Control is based on Clear, the 1982 track by Mr. Atkinss old duo, Cybotron. He is to play a D.J. set at this afternoons dance party; expect a wide-ranging journey, anchored by a hard, sharp pulse. 3 p.m., P.S. 1, 22-25 Jackson Avenue, at 46th Avenue, Long Island City, Queens, (718)784-2084, $8. (Kelefa Sanneh) BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY (Tonight) The mid-90s neo-swing movement was good to this sax-based group, which had less charm than the Squirrel Nut Zippers but has continued to tour the lounge and ballroom circuit. 8 and 10 p.m., B.B. King Blues Club and Grill, 243 West 42nd Street, (212)997-4144, $25.(Laura Sinagra) COHEED & CAMBRIA, PANTHERS (Thursday) Coheed and Cambria play a rough brand of metallic rock that veers into the prog preoccupation with supernatural lore and legend. The Brooklyn punkers the Panthers make incendiary music conscious of both the avant-garde and grass-roots politics. 8 p.m., Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey Street, Lower East Side, (212)533-2111, $18. (Sinagra) ELVIS COSTELLO & THE IMPOSTERS, EMMYLOU HARRIS (Tuesday) For all his collaborating and genre-splicing, Elvis Costello burns brightest with his tautly ferocious rock band. Country rocks Ms. Harris continues to contemplate love and loss with trademark ghostly tenderness, 6 p.m., Central Park Summerstage, Rumsey Field, 72nd Street at Fifth Avenue, (212)360-2777, $57.50, $60 at the door. (Jon Pareles) THE DONNAS (Thursday) The brash charm of these rockers has always teetered between been fabulous and pre-fabricated. But any fiesty put-ons fall away when the guitarist Donna R lays into her three-chord Ramones riffs and more recent arena rock solos with single-minded verve. 6:30 p.m., Pier 54, Hudson River Park, at 13th Street, free. (Sinagra) FAITH EVANS (Tomorrow)Biggie Smallss widow seems to be finally emerging as her own creative self. Her touted soul power has seemed diffuse in the past, but this survivors latest material plays on her natural warmth rather than her dancefloor exhortations. 11:30 p.m., B.B. King Blues Club and Grill, 243 West 42nd Street, (212)997-4144, $35. (Sinagra) FEMI KUTI, BRAZILIAN GIRLS (Sunday) Femi Kuti plays a less confrontational but no less propulsive version of the Afro-beat invented by his father, Fela Anikulapo Kuti. Its burly Nigerian funk with bruising horn riffs, jazzy solos, dancing backup singers and lyrics that mix seriousness and sensuality within the groove. Openers Brazilian Girls play erotic, electronica-inflected reggae and bossa novas. 3 p.m., Central Park Summerstage, Rumsey Field, 72nd Street at Fifth Avenue,(212)360-2777, free. (Pareles) HIDDEN CAMERAS, DRESSY BESSY, PONY DA LOOK (Tonight) The Canadian collective Hidden Cameras, one of the first and best in the current wave, brings to its pop a unified drive less fretful than the anthemic country folk of its compatriots Arcade Fire. An intentionally chaotic live show coheres without seeming cultish or hinging on the frisson of collapse. Dressy Bessys sassy bounce harkens back to gutsy, melodic alt-punk. Pony Da Look plays a bluesier version of the same. 8:30 p.m., Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancy Street, (212)260-4700, $15, $17 at the door.. (Sinagra) FREEDY JOHNSTON (Tuesday) Freedy Johnstons finely turned country-rock songs have carefully balanced melodies that he sings in a winsome tenor. But for all their classic symmetry, theyre the confessions of desperate, unsavory and unbalanced characters. 11p.m., Living Room, 154 Ludlow Street, (212)533-7235, free. (Pareles) KEREN ANN (Wednesday) The globe-gliding chanteuse Keren Ann applies her velvety voice to jazz-inflected rainy day urban valentines. 9:30 p.m., Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey Street, Lower East Side, (212)533-2111, $16, $18 at the door. (Sinagra) LYLE LOVETT (Monday) Mr. Lovett has an ache in his voice that he uses to sound utterly heartfelt even when his songs grow wry and absurd. His limber band covers the Texas spectrum from swing to honky-tonk to gospel. 6:30 p.m., Central Park Summerstage, Rumsey Field, 72nd Street at Fifth Avenue, (212) 360-2777, $39.50, $60 at the door. (Pareles) LUCIANO (Monday) As rough dancehall and raunchy reggaeton command the spotlight, the crooning baritone Luciano representsreggaes spiritual traditionalists, with songs like Its Me Again Jah. 8 p.m., B.B. King Blues Club and Grill, 243 West 42nd Street, (212)997-4144, $20, $24 at the door. (Sinagra) SHELBY LYNNE (Tonight) As odd as it is that this sad country belle has never found the perfect vehicle for her gorgeously flexible but smoky voice; shes still in posession of one of the best tones around. 7 p.m., Central Park Summerstage, Rumsey Field, 72nd Street at Fifth Avenue, (212)360-2777, free. (Sinagra) MAZE FEATURING FRANKIE BEVERLY (Tonight) Having honed his old-school soul croon to perfection, Frankie Beverly is not concerned with hip-hop crossover credibility. His Marvin Gaye-influenced flow and the retro R&B stylings of his band, Maze, draw adoring crowds. 8 p.m., Beacon Theater, 2124 Broadway, at 74th Street, (212) 496-7070, $79. (Sinagra) JOHN MELLENCAMP, JOHN FOGERTY (Tomorrow) Grown up and still pugnacious, John Mellencamp packs his three-chord heartland rock with anti-authority taunts and tough-minded comments on racism, family farms and woman trouble. John Fogertys wild-eyed wail and distilled guitar twang are utterly undiminished, the sound of a mythic backwoods Southland where barefoot girls dance in the moonlight. 7 p.m., PNC Bank Arts Center, Exit 116 Garden State Parkway, Holmdel, N.J., (732)335-0400, $20 to $78. (Pareles) RAUL MIDON (Thursday) This vocalist and multi-instrumentalist has contributed his talents to the work of many Latin pop superstars. He plays his own material here. Noon, MetroTech Commons Plaza, Flatbush Avenue and Myrtle Street, Downtown Brooklyn, free.(Sinagra) CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE, BETTYE LAVETTE (Tonight) Charlie Musselwhite has been a celebrated harmonica player since the 1960s. He lets his conversational voice contemplate memories and mortality before reaching for deep blues with his harmonica. Detroits Bettye LaVette released her first recording when she was 16, and soldiered on through a career that carried her through 15 labels, rhythm-and-blues hits like He Made a Woman out of Me, and a stint in Broadways Bubblin Brown Sugar. 7:30 p.m., Celebrate Brooklyn, Prospect Park Bandshell, Prospect Park West and Ninth Street, Park Slope, Brooklyn, $3 suggested donation. (Pareles) M. WARD (Thursday) The echoing guitar folk-pop songs of this singer-songwriter combine heartfelt campfire zeal with the ruminative sadness of mid-tempo 70s AM radio hits. His delicate ascents can also lilt upward into a cabaret falsetto reminiscent of Jeff Buckley. 7 p.m.,Castle Clinton National Monument, Battery Park, Manhattan, (212)835-2789, free. (Sinagra) MU, THE JUAN MACLEAN (Thursday) Mu has the distinction of perfectly capturing the sex-addled twitch of celebrity culture with its electro-disco Paris Hilton. The Juan McLean makes beat-happy hipster dance music as well, though more straightforwardly. 9 p.m., Rothko, 116 Suffolk Street, $15. (Sinagra) NADA SURF (Tonight) These Brooklyn alt-rockers tumbled into obscurity after a mid-90s MTV hit, then re-emerged in 2002 with the lovingly Let Go (Barsuk), which squints nostalgically at imagined childhood bliss through a snowy pane. 7 p.m., Housing Works Used Book Cafe, 126 Crosby Street, SoHo, (212)334-3324, $25. (Sinagra) O.A.R. (Tonight) This jam band plays the sax and guitar reggae-inflected rock beloved by fans of the Dave Matthews Band who can shout along to literal-minded hoedown ditties like That Was a Crazy Game of Poker. 7 p.m., Jones Beach Theater, 1000 Ocean Parkway, Wantagh, N.Y., (516)221-1000, $20 to $30. (Sinagra) JENNIFER OCONNOR, BANTAM, FUR CUPS FOR TEETH, BROADBAND, THE BATTLECATS (Sunday) This benefit show for the Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls features local musicans like the singer-songwriter Jennifer OConnor, the electro-clashing Fur Cups for Teeth, the shouty post-punkers Broadband, the spare poppers The Battlecats, and the alt-rockers Bantam. 6 p.m., Rothko, 116 Suffolk Street, Lower East Side, rothkonyc.com, $10. (Sinagra) PAPA WEMBA & VIVA LA MUSICA (Monday) The Congolese soukous bandleader Papa Wemba, whose commanding vocal style was influenced by his professional mourner mother, has been smartly mixing rhumba, Parisan fusion, and stateside rock with muscular versatility since 1970. 9 p.m., S.O.B.s, 204 Varick Street, South Village, (212)243-4940, $25 to $30. (Sinagra) PEACE OUT EAST (Tonight) This weekend-long festival celebrates the lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender presence in hip-hop. The party begins tonight with a showcase that promises a blend of rapping, singing and spoken word; scheduled performers include baron, Dewayne Dickerson, Buttaflysoul, Timm West and others. Visit www.peaceouteast.com for a schedule of the weekends events, at a variety of clubs. 10 p.m., the Bowery Poetry Club, 308 Bowery, near Bleecker Street, East Village, (212)614-0505, $10. (Sanneh) THE PONYS (Tonight) The Ponys take an energized and raggedy run at mid-American new wave, realizing theres more to life than lovers who let you down. They yell about their pets and their agoraphobia with obvious gratitude that youre willing to hear them out. 11 p.m., Rothko, 116 Suffolk Street, Lower East Side, rothkonyc.com, $5. (Sinagra) STEW (Tomorrow) This L.A. pop craftsman writes songs that slip just enough bitters into the 70s lite rock cocktail to make it subversive. His faux-big production on disc isnt required live, because his songs are cabaret to the core. And aside from chuckling at his own asides, this sophisticate art-radical is a consummate performer. 9:30 p.m., Joes Pub, 425 Lafayette Street, East Village, (212)539-8778, $15, $20 at the door. (Sinagra) SUGAR WATER FESTIVAL: ERYKAH BADU, JILL SCOTT, QUEEN LATIFAH, FLOETRY (Tonight) Popular purveyors of soulful female self-determination gather for a mini-tour of neo-soul artists: Ms. Badus slinky, cheeky Afrocentric scrape, Ms. Scotts warm Philly funk, Queen Latifahs gutsy hip-hop and more recently, jazz standards, and Floetrys groovy uplift. 7 p.m., PNC Bank Arts Center, Exit 116 Garden State Parkway, Holmdel, N.J., (732)335-0400, $21 to $76. (Sinagra) TINARIWEN (Tuesday and Wednesday) This guitar band from the deserts of Mali turns Touareg cultures acoustic music into a chant-based kind of distended electric blues, addressing realities of exile, displacement and poverty. Before the Joes Pub show, a DVD will be shown of a live show featuring the band and others like Robert Plant and Ali Farka Toure. Tuesday at 7 p.m., the Hudson River Festival, World Financial Center, Winter Garden, West and Vesey Streets, (212)945-0505, free. Wednesday at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. (DVD at 6:30 p.m.), Joes Pub, 425 Lafayette Street, East Village, (212)539-8778 or (212)239-6200, $20. (Sinagra) THE WRENS (Thursday) These rockers write about life in their home state of New Jersey, but not with a Fountains of Wayne smirk. With their routinely understated, meditative albums and their intense, up-tempo live shows, they offer a different response to suburban tensions. 8:30 p.m., Maxwells, 1039 Washington Street, Hoboken, N.J., (201)653-1703, $10 (sold out). (Sinagra) YELLOWMAN (Thursday) More proof that Jamaican music is stranger than fiction. Yellowman is a great dance-hall reggae vocalist who also happens to be an albino. He has built his career on tongue-in-cheek sexual boasts, and although his popularity peaked about 20 years ago, he still puts on a good show, mixing wicked wit with sentimental old favorites. 7:30 p.m., the Downtown, 190 Main Street, Farmingdale, N.Y, (516)293-7700, $18, $20 at the door. (Sanneh) Jazz Full reviews of recent jazz concerts: nytimes.com/music. CYRO BAPTISTA AND BEAT THE DONKEY (Tomorrow) The theatricality and kinetic energy of this percussion-heavy troupe can occasionally overshadow its slyly intelligent spin on third world fusions. but those qualities will surely be welcome on this one-night stand, which includes an afternoon childrens performance. 4, 8 and 11 p.m., Knitting Factory, 74 Leonard Street, TriBeCa, (212)219-3132; cover, $12. (Nate Chinen) BRAZILIAN NIGHTS: THE MUSIC OF ANTONIO CARLOS JOBIM, STAN GETZ AND CAL TJADER (Tuesday through July 24) An over-the-shoulder glance at the popular heyday of bossa nova, featuring the expatriate Brazilian group Trio da Paz along with the singer Maucha Adnet, the tenor saxophonist Harry Allen and the vibraphonist Joe Locke. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Dizzys Club Coca-Cola, Frederick P. Rose Hall, 60th Street and Broadway, Jazz at Lincoln Center, (212)258-9595; cover, $30, with a minimum of $10 at tables, $5 at the bar. (Chinen) CELEBRATE NEW ORLEANS (Tomorrow) The tradition of New Orleans-bred trumpeter-entertainers has an especially robust representative in Kermit Ruffins, who appears here with his Barbecue Swingers. Adding to the Crescent City feel are the Rebirth Brass Band, which Mr. Ruffins cofounded and played in for a decade; and New Mardi Gras Sounds, an amalgam of Mardi Gras Indian parade music and contemporary electronics conceived by the alto saxophonist Donald Harrison Jr. 3 p.m., Central Park SummerStage, Rumsey Field, 72nd Street and Fifth Avenue, (212)360-2777; no cover. (Chinen) PAQUITO DRIVERA NEW QUINTET (Tonight and tomorrow) A former child prodigy and a longtime ambassador for Latin jazz, Mr. DRivera leads an ensemble here that backs his clarinet and alto saxophone with cello, piano, bass and drums. 9 and 11 p.m., Birdland, 315 West 44th Street, Manhattan, (212)581-3080; cover, $40, plus a $10 minimum. (Chinen) MARTY EHRLICHS TRAVELERS TALES (Tonight) Mr. Ehrlich is a highly proficient clarinetist, saxophonist and flutist whose original compositions lean toward jangly lyricism; his band here consists of the trombonist Ray Anderson, the bassist Mark Helias and the drummer Allison Miller. 10 p.m., 55 Bar, 55 Christopher Street, West Village, (212)929-9883; cover, $10. (Chinen) LIBERTY ELLMAN SEXTET (Tuesday) Mr. Ellman, a thoughtful guitarist and composer, introduces a coolly experimental ensemble consisting of Mark Shim and Steve Lehman, saxophones; Jose Davila, tuba; Stephan Crump, bass; and Gerald Cleaver, drums. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Jazz Standard, 116 East 27th Street, Manhattan, (212)576-2232; cover, $20. (Chinen) MAYNARD FERGUSON & HIS BIG BOP NOUVEAU BAND (Through Sunday) His signature high notes have inevitably lost some luster, but Mr. Ferguson is still a bravura trumpeter and charismatic bandleader, and this ensemble suits both sets of skills. 8 and 10:30 p.m., Blue Note, 131 West Third Street, West Village, (212)475-8592; cover, $25 at tables, with a $5 minimum or $15 at the bar, with a one-drink minimum. (Chinen) FIELDWORK (Thursday) Simulated Progress (Pi), the new album by this collaborative trio, throws down a gauntlet of jagged melodies and asymmetrical rhythmic forms; the heart of the groups sound is an ever-shifting rapport between the pianist Vijay Iyer, the saxophonist Steve Lehman and the drummer Eliot Humberto Kavee. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Jazz Standard, 116 East 27th Street, Manhattan, (212)576-2232; cover, $20.(Chinen) ROBERT GLASPER EXPERIMENT (Wednesday) There isnt a young musician with more buzz at the moment than Mr. Glasper, a bright and well-rounded pianist recently signed to Blue Note Records. The experiment in the title is a license to go beyond jazz-trio territory, and possibly indulge serious affinities for hip-hop, house and soul. 11 p.m., Knitting Factory, 74 Leonard Street, TriBeCa, (212)219-3132, no cover. (Chinen) JIMMY GREENE QUINTET (Tuesday through July 24) Mr. Greene brings an athletic self-assurance to his saxophone playing; his top-shelf post-bop band includes the vibraphonist Stefon Harris, the pianist Xavier Davis, the bassist Vicente Archer and the drummer Eric Harland. 9 and 11 p.m., Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, at 11th Street, West Village, (212)255-4037; cover, $20, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) CURTIS HASSELBRING AND THE NEW MELLOW EDWARDS (Monday) Hardcore punk and experimental rock are more than idle influences on this band, which consists of the trombonist Curtis Hasselbring, the multi-reedist Chris Speed, the drummer John Hollenbeck and the bassist Trevor Dunn. 9 p.m., Barbes, 376 Ninth Street at Sixth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn, (718)965-9177; cover, $10. (Chinen) WAYNE KRANTZ TRIO (Thursday) With roots in both jazz and rock, Mr. Krantz manages a genre splice leaner and more rugged than most fusions; hes aided here by the electric bassist Anthony Jackson and the drummer Keith Carlock. 10 p.m., 55 Bar, 55 Christopher Street, West Village, (212)929-9883; cover, $15 (includes two drinks). (Chinen) RUDRESH MAHANTHAPPA QUARTET (Wednesday) Mr. Mahanthappa is an alto saxophonist with quick reflexes and a razor-sharp tone; his ensemble, which features the pianist Vijay Iyer, borrows some rhythmic ideas from South Indian classical music but never abandons jazz-based group interplay. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Jazz Standard, 116 East 27th Street, Manhattan, (212)576-2232; cover, $20.(Chinen) JUNIOR MANCE TRIO (Tonight and tomorrow) A veteran pianist with tendencies toward both bebop and blues, Mr. Mance leads a working band with the bassist Hidehiko Tanaka and the drummer Jackie Williams. 8 and 9:45 p.m., Kitano Hotel, 66 Park Avenue, at 38th Street, (212)885-7119; cover, $20, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) OTHER DIMENSIONS IN MUSIC (Sunday) A free-improvising super-group, composed of the trumpeter Roy Campbell, the multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter, the bassist William Parker and the drummer Rashid Bakr. 8 p.m., CBGB Lounge, 313 Bowery, between First and Second Streets, (212)677-0455; cover, $10.(Chinen) PEOPLE LIKE US (Wednesday) Led by the pianist Joel Forrester, this engaging bop-flavored quartet oscillates between jazz standards and Mr. Forresters offbeat original tunes; Clare Daly, a nimble baritone saxophonist, takes the melodic lead. 8 and 10 p.m., Sweet Rhythm, 88 Seventh Avenue South, at Bleecker Street, West Village, (212)255-3626; cover, $15, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) STEPPIN WITH TITO PUENTE (Through Sunday) The late King of Salsa receives an appropriately high-spirited tribute from a group that includes the pianist Hilton Ruiz, the trumpeter Lew Soloff, the tenor saxophonist Lew Tabackin and the drummer Sylvia Cuenca. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Dizzys Club Coca-Cola, Frederick P. Rose Hall, 60th Street and Broadway, Jazz at Lincoln Center, (212)258-9595; cover, $30, with a minimum of $10 at tables, $5 at the bar. (Chinen) MATTHEW SHIPP STRING TRIO (Monday) This ensemble favors an abstract ideal thats neither shapeless nor devoid of pulse; its a product of the probing piano of Mr. Shipp, the stout bass playing of William Parker, and the slippery violin and viola of Mat Maneri. 8 and 10:30 p.m., Blue Note, 131 West Third Street, West Village, (212)475-8592; cover, $10 at tables, with a $5 minimum or $5 at the bar, with a one-drink minimum. (Chinen) TYSHAWN SOREYS OBLIQUITY (Tuesday) Mr. Soreys explosive drumming has been a welcome new force in the contemporary avant-garde; his compositional abilities find an outlet in this quartet featuring the alto saxophonist Loren Stillman, the pianist Russ Lossing and the bassist Carlo DeRosa. 8 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, www.thestonenyc.com; cover, $10. (Chinen) SPANISH HARLEM ORCHESTRA (Tuesday) The pianist and salsa legend Oscar Hernandez leads this celebrated band, which summons the spit-and-polish style of the Palladium era without forsaking neighborhood grit. 7 p.m., St. Marys Park, 146th Street and St. Anns Avenue, Bronx, www.cityparksfoundation.org; no cover. (Chinen) *CECIL TAYLOR TRIO (Tuesday and Wednesday) The leonine father figure of free-jazz piano has lost none of his percussive fire, but he tempers it here with his poetry, which tends toward the mysterious and metaphysical. Albey Balgochian and Jackson Krall, on bass and drums, serve as instigators as well as character foils. 8 and 10:30 p.m., Blue Note, 131 West Third Street, West Village, (212)475-8592; cover, $27.50 at tables, with a $5 minimum or $15 at the bar, with a one-drink minimum. (Chinen) STEVE TURRE QUINTET (Tonight and tomorrow) Mr. Turre, the trombonist and conch shell player, brings both virtuosity and restraint to the conventions of small-group hard bop. 9 and 11 p.m. and 12:30 a.m., Smoke, 2751 Broadway at 106th Street, Manhattan, (212)864-6662; cover, $25. (Chinen) BUSTER WILLIAMS AND SOMETHING MORE (Through Sunday) Mr. Williamss bass playing is the anchor but not the focal point of this dynamic chamber-jazz quartet, with Steve Nelson, vibraphonist; Patrice Rushen, pianist; and Lenny White, drummer. 9 and 11 p.m., Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, at 11th Street, West Village, (212)255-4037; cover, $20 with a $10 minimum. (Chinen) Classical Full reviews of recent music performances: nytimes.com/music. Opera GLIMMERGLASS (Tomorrow, Sunday, Monday and Thursday) To be counted among the countrys leading summer opera festivals, it helps to have imagination and unusual repertory, and Glimmerglass offers that in spades. A highlight this week is the first performance of a new production of a truly odd double bill: Portrait de Manon, Jules Massenets one-act sequel to his most famous opera, paired with Poulencs Voix Humaine, another one-acter that presents a one-sided dialogue: a woman on the phone. Also in performance this week is another opera in French -- the French-language version of Donizettis Lucie de Lammermoor. Portrait and Voix, tomorrow night at 8 and Monday afternoon at 2; Lucie, Sunday afternoon at 2 and Thursday at 8 p.m., Alice Busch Theater, Route 80, eight miles north of Cooperstown, N.Y., (607)547-2255, $31.50 to $80. (Anne Midgette) Classical Music ASTON MAGNA (Tomorrow) The early-music scene in the Northeast has long shuttled between New York and Boston, and what better middle ground is there in the summer than the Berkshire foothills? The program here, Love Stung by a Bee, presents music of the French Baroque, performed by the soprano Dominique Labelle, the violinist Daniel Stepner and others. 5 p.m., Daniels Arts Center, Simons Rock College, Great Barrington, Mass., (413)528-3595 or (800)875-7156, $35; $30 in advance; $25 for students and 65+, available at the door. The program will also be presented tonight at 8 at Olin Hall, Bard College, Route 9G, Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y., (845)758-7425, $25; $20 for students and 62+. (James R. Oestreich) BARGEMUSIC (Tonight through Thursday) There are few cozier places to hear chamber music in New York than this floating concert hall (a former coffee barge) on the Brooklyn side of the East River. The fare is varied this week: Beethoven and Schubert Piano Trios tonight; concertos by Vivaldi, Bach, Bottesini and Shohl Karman, tomorrow and Sunday and a piano recital (Chopin and Schubert sonatas) by Hamish Milne on Thursday. Tonight, tomorrow and Thursday at 7:30; Sunday at 4. Bargemusic, Fulton Ferry Landing next to the Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn. (718)624-2083), tonight and Thursday, $35; tomorrow and Sunday, $40; $30 for 65+ on Thursday only; $25 for students. (Allan Kozinn) BERKSHIRE CHORAL FESTIVAL (Tomorrow) For listeners who love choral music, this festival is an ideal refuge, combining the charms of the Berkshires and some of the highlights of the choral repertory, performed by a large choir of enthusiastic singers, led by renowned choral conductors. This week, Craig Jessop, the music director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, leads Poulencs magnificent Gloria, Vaughan Williamss Dona Nobis Pacem and Marc Wilbergs Four American Folk Hymns. 8 p.m., the Berkshire School, Route 41, Sheffield, Mass., (413)229-1999, $25 to $40. (Kozinn) BRIAN FERNEYHOUGH (Monday, Wednesday and Thursday) There arent many opportunities to take in music by this British dean of high-modernist complexity, but on Thursday, the Lincoln Center Festival presents the American premiere of his Shadowtime, a challenging thought opera based on the life and work of the philosopher Walter Benjamin, with a libretto by the poet Charles Bernstein. Building on the occasion, the New Juilliard Ensemble will perform some of Mr. Ferneyhoughs chamber music on Monday, following a discussion of the opera. On Wednesday, Mr. Bernstein moderates a panel on Benjamin. Monday at 6 and 8 p.m., Paul Hall, the Juilliard School, 60 Lincoln Center Plaza, at 65th Street; Wednesday at 6 p.m., Kaplan Penthouse, the Rose Building, 165 West 65th Street, 10th floor; Thursday, Rose Theater, Broadway at 60th Street, (212)271-6500, $25 to $55 for the opera; the chamber concert and symposiums are free, but tickets are required. (Jeremy Eichler) INTERNATIONAL KEYBOARD INSTITUTE AND FESTIVAL (Sunday) This annual festival, now in its seventh summer season, again promises to keep even the most insatiable lover of piano music happy. There will be two full weeks of recitals, master classes, panel discussions and lectures, with a mini-competition thrown in. The founding director of the festival is the pianist Jerome Rose, a Mannes College faculty member. As usual, Mr. Rose claims the opening night slot for his own recital, which offers Schuberts stormy Sonata in C minor (D. 958) and Brahmss exhilaratingly virtuosic Handel Variations. 8 p.m., Mannes College of Music, 150 West 85th Street, Manhattan, (212)580-0210, Ext. 4858, $20.(Anthony Tommasini) MARLBORO MUSIC FESTIVAL (Tomorrow and Sunday) The idyllic Marlboro Music Festival has long been a place where the process of studying and playing chamber music has been more central to the festivals participants than presenting scheduled public concerts, whose programs have traditionally not been announced in advance. The festival is getting more organized about its concert schedule, though. The programs and players for the summer series are now being announced a week in advance. The opening weekend begins tomorrow with Mozarts String Quintet in D and Messiaens Quartet for the End of Time. Sunday brings more Mozart (a piano trio and the Serenade in E-flat for winds), and works by Korngold and Wolpe. As always, the performances bring together emerging young artists with master musicians like the pianist Mitsuko Uchida, who directs the festival with her pianist colleague Richard Goode. Tomorrow at 8:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2:30 p.m., Marlboro Music School and Festival, Marlboro, Vt., (802)254-2394, $15 to $30; $5 for canopy areas. (Tommasini) MAVERICK CONCERTS (Tomorrow and Sunday) This concert series near Woodstock, N.Y., now in its 90th season, offers its performances in an open-backed barn that allows the sounds of nature to mingle with the music. This week the focus is on music for piano and strings. Tomorrow, Shai Wosner, a pianist, joins members of the MirĂł String Quartet for piano quartets by Mozart and Brahms; the MirĂł players also offer a string trio by Françaix. On Sunday, the pianist Lydia Artymiw and the Miami String Quartet play the Dohnanyi Piano Quintet No. 1 on a program that also includes string quartets by Alan Shulman and Beethoven. Tomorrow at 6 p.m., Sunday at 3 p.m., Maverick Concert Hall, Maverick Road, between Routes 28 and 375, West Hurley, N.Y., (845)679-8217, $20, $5 for students. (Kozinn) MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE HAMPTONS (Tonight through Thursday) From an evening of Gershwin with Kitty Carlisle Hart and friends (tonight) to the Mozart Requiem (on Sunday), this festival offers a potpourri of events in this second week of its 10th season. Lukas Foss, the festivals music director, and Itzhak Perlman perform together at a benefit for the Perlman Music Program for young artists (tomorrow); chamber music from Vienna and Paris comes later in the week; and, among other concerts, a three-part lecture series offers Master Classes for the Listener. Festival Tent, Morriss Center School, 739 Butter Lane, Bridgehampton, N.Y., (800)644-4418, $15 to $50; more for benefits. (Midgette) MUSIC MOUNTAIN (Tonight and Sunday) Offering a smattering of choral music and jazz, but focusing on string quartets, this venerable festival has a quartet called the Amernet on Sunday playing Haydn and Brahms, then joining forces with the pianist Alpin Hong for works by Schubert, Granados and Wagner (a version of the Siegfried Idyll). Tonight, theres a choral concert by a male a cappella group called the Ten of the University Glee Club of New York City, offering everything from traditional to contemporary, including Billy Joel and the Beatles. Tonight at 8, Sunday afternoon at 3, Gordon Hall at Music Mountain, Falls Village, Conn., (860)824-7126, $25, $12 for students. (Midgette) NORFOLK CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL (Tonight and tomorrow) Each summer the Yale Summer School of Music retreats north to this lovely spot, and the public reaps much of the benefit at concerts in the rustic Music Shed. This weekend the Fine Arts Quartet takes the stage, with other performers tonight in works of Glinka, Stravinsky and Shostakovich, and on its own tomorrow in works of Grieg, Bruckner and Antheil. 8 p.m., Ellen Battell Stoeckel Estate, Routes 44 and 272, Norfolk, Conn., (860)542-3000, $15 to $45; $10 for ages 18 to 25; free to those under 18 with paying adult. (Oestreich) PIANO SUMMER AT NEW PALTZ (Tomorrow) Currently in its 10th season, this festival features lectures, master classes and a competition for rising young pianists as well as recitals by the festival faculty. Tomorrow night, Vladimir Feltsman, the artistic director, will be joined by Robert Hamilton, Paul Ostrovsky and other faculty in an all-Beethoven program. 8 p.m., McKenna Theater, State University of New York at New Paltz, (845)257-3880, $27; $22 for students and 65+. (Eichler) PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA (Tonight) Howard Shores Lord of the Rings Symphony returns to the orchestras concerts at the Mann Center with illustrations and storyboards from the movie. Markus Huber conducts. 8 p.m., Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 5201 Parkside Avenue, Philadelphia, (215)893-1999, $20 to $68; lawn admission is $10. (Bernard Holland) TANGLEWOOD (Tonight, tomorrow and Sunday) An enticing weekend of Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts begins tonight when the dynamic American conductor David Robertson, a champion of contemporary music, shows his Viennese Classical affinities with Haydns Symphony No. 88 and two works for violin by Mozart, the Concerto No. 3 and the Rondo in C, with the brilliant German violinist Christian Tetzlaff. The program opens with Stravinskys Dumbarton Oaks, a Neo-Classical work that abounds with the spirit of Mozart. One of the most eagerly awaited concerts of the summer comes tomorrow night, when James Levine leads the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra in an all-Wagner program. The soprano Deborah Voigt is an acclaimed Sieglinde, so the audience will know what its in for with Act I of Die WalkĂŒre. But Ms. Voigt takes another step toward adding the role of BrĂŒnnhilde to her repertory in the concerts second half, a concert performance of the final act of GötterdĂ€mmerung. On Sunday afternoon Mr. Levine and the pianist Peter Serkin have another go at Charles Wuorinens Piano Concerto No. 4, a work they gave the premiere of this past season. The eclectic and interesting program includes works by John Harbison, VarĂšse and Gershwin. Tonight and tomorrow night at 8:30, Sunday at 2:30, Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass., (888)266-1200, $19 to $85; $17 for lawn seats. (Tommasini) Cabaret Full reviews of recent cabaret shows: nytimes.com/music. *BLOSSOM DEARIE (Tomorrow and Sunday) To watch this singer and pianist is to appreciate the power of a carefully deployed pop-jazz minimalism combined with a highly discriminating taste in songs. Dannys Skylight Room, 346 West 46th Street, Clinton, (212)265-8133. Tomorrow night at 7; Sunday night at 6:15. Cover: $25, with a $15 minimum; a $54.50 dinner-and-show package is available. (Stephen Holden) Dance Full reviews of recent performances: nytimes.com/dance. *AMERICAN BALLET THEATER (Tonight through tomorrow) The companys annual Metropolitan Opera House season comes to an end this weekend with three final performances of Giselle. Julie Kent dances the title role tonight and tomorrow night, with Xiomara Reyes tomorrow afternoon. Julio Bocca is Ms. Kents partner tonight, with Veronika Part as Myrta. Jose Manuel Carreño is Albrecht tomorrow night, with Michele Wiles. Angel Corella dances opposite Ms. Reyes, with Carmen Corella. Tonight and tomorrow at 8 p.m., tomorrow at 2 p.m. Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center, (212)362-6000 or www.abt.org, $22 to $130. (John Rockwell) ARTICHOKE DANCE COMPANY (Thursday through Sunday) Lynn Neumans Look at Me (when I talk to you), a new work about moments that precipitate action or change, shares a program with the circuslike Origins. 8 p.m., Joyce SoHo, 155 Mercer Street, (212)334-7479 $20, $10 students, 65+ and dancers. (Jack Anderson) *BOLSHOI BALLET (Monday through July 30) Both the Bolshoi Ballet and its opera companies have been challenged of late by St. Petersburgs Kirov operation, but this remains the big (bolshoi means big) Russian troupe in the popular imagination, and recently the ballet in particular has shown signs of rejuvenation. Monday marks its return to the Metropolitan Opera House after an 18-year absence (the company was at the New York State Theater in 1990 and 2000). The Bolshoi is offering four evening-length works, mostly fresh and unusual and all interesting as showcases for dancers. Monday through Thursday comes the opening salvo in the form of Petipas comic Don Quixote, the same ballet that opened American Ballet Theaters Met season eight weeks before. (The rest of the repertory consists of that Soviet show horse Spartacus; the new artistic director Alexei Ratmanskys Bright Stream, to music of Shostakovich; and a Petipa revival, The Pharaohs Daughter.) In Don Quixote, Svetlana Zakharova dances Kitri on Monday and returns on Thursday, both times partnered by Andrei Uvarov as Basil. On Tuesday its Maria Alexandrova and Sergei Filin, and on Wednesday, Galina Stephanenko and Yuri Klevtsov. Monday through Thursday at 8 p.m. Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center, (212)362-6000 or www.metopera.org, $45 to $150. (Rockwell) EVA DEAN DANCE (Wednesday through July 31) Bounce blithely combines bouncing balls and bounding bodies. Wednesday through Saturday at 7:30 p.m., an abridged version for children will be danced Saturdays and Sundays and July 27 at 2 p.m., Dance Theater Workshop, 219 West 19th Street, (212) 924-0077 $13 to $25.(Anderson) IMAGO DANCE THEATER (Opens Thursday) Stress Addicted Nation romps through the overscheduled lives of stressaholics. Thursday through July 24 at 8 p.m., Joyce SoHo, 155 Mercer Street, (212)334-7479, $20, $15 students, 65+ and dancers. (Anderson) JAXDANCE (Through July 23) The title of Jaclyn Moynahans Whats Holding You Up? has a deliberate double meaning, for the work concerns both the limitations that impede us and the devices that help us cope with lifes challenges. Thursday through July 23 at 8:30, Studio 111, 111 Conselyea Street, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, (718)387-2630, $12, $10 students and 65+. (Anderson) *LINCOLN CENTER FESTIVAL (Tonight through July 31) Tonight and tomorrow night are the last two performances of Merce Cunninghams magisterial, rarely seen Ocean, at Jazz at Lincoln Centers new Rose Theater. The festivals dance offerings continue on Monday with the first of three performances in the intimate Clark Studio Theater of Mugiyono Kasido, an Indonesian dancer-choreographer billed as an event related to Robert Wilsons Indonesian theater epic I La Galigo. Tuesday (and July 23 and 24) at the New York State Theater will be the much-hailed Shen Wei Dance Arts, which has sprung onto the international dance circuit seemingly from nowhere. In between, also at the State Theater, comes Random Dance, another of the endless flood of edgy British modern-dance troupes. Its AtaXia is billed as a techno-multimedia dance. Cunningham tonight and tomorrow at 8 p.m. Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center, 60th and Broadway, $35 to $70. Kasido Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at 8 p.m., Clark Studio Theater, Rose Building, Lincoln Center, $35. Shen Wei Tuesday at 8 p.m., New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, $45. Random Dance Thursday and next Friday at 8 p.m., State Theater, $45. (212)271-6500, www.lincolncenter.org. (Rockwell) TERE OCONNOR (Tonight and tomorrow) Dont be fooled by the title. Everythings fluid in Frozen Mommy, a study in evocative shifts of situation and characterization. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Dance Theater Workshop, 219 West 19th Street, Chelsea, (212)924-0077 or www.dtw.org $20, $12, students, 65+ and D.T.W. members (Anderson). *JACOBS PILLOW DANCE FESTIVAL (Tonight through Aug. 3) Tonight through Sunday Alonza Kings Lines Ballet from San Francisco will alternate with the modern-dance choregrapher Ben Munisteri. Wednesday through next Sunday Garth Fagan will be here, joined Thursday through next Sunday by A Poc a Poc, a Barcelona-born, Mexico City-based modern-dance troupe in its United States debut. Lines at the Ted Shawn Theater, tonight and tomorrow at 8 p.m., tomorrow and Sunday at 2 p.m. $50; $45 for students, 65+ and children. Munisteri at the Doris Duke Studio Theater, tonight and tomorrow at 8:15 p.m., tomorrow at 2:15 p.m. and Sunday at 5 p.m. $20; $18 for students, seniors and children. Fagan at the Shawn Theater Wednesday and Thursday at 8 p.m. $45; $40.50 for students, 65+ and children. A Poc a Poc at the Duke Theater, Thursday at 8:15. $20; $18 for students, 65+ and children. Details of the weeks free performances and exhibitions can be found on www.jacobspillow.org. Jacobs Pillow Dance Festival, 358 George Carter Road, Becket, Mass., (413)243-0745. (Rockwell) RED WALL DANCE THEATER (Through Sunday) A company of six women presents works that integrate dance and theater to comment on the bizarre twists of human experience. Tonight at 8, tomorrow at 7 and 9 p.m., Sunday at 7:30 p.m., Far Space, 521 West 26th Street, (718)781-1785 $10. (Anderson) SITELINES: TOM PEARSON (Today and tomorrow) Reel choreographically uses the rotunda of a former United States Customs House to comment on themes of dominance and reconciliation. 2 p.m., Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, Lower Manhattan, (212)514-3888. free.(Anderson) SOUTH PLEASANT COMPANY (Tuesday) Cristina Septiens To One I Saw Small tells the story of a disenchanted spelling-bee champion with the aid of movement, dialogue and video. Tuesday at 8 p.m., Ars Nova Theater, 511 West 54th Street, Midtown, (212)352-7112, $15. (Anderson) Art Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. Museums *AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM: ANCESTRY AND INNOVATION, through Sept. 4. This selection of quilts, paintings, sculptures and drawings by several generations of self-taught artists jumps with color and talent and reflects a sharp curatorial eye. 45 West 53rd Street, (212)265-1040. (Roberta Smith) AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM: SELF AND SUBJECT, through Sept. 11. From Grandma Mosess view of herself beguiled by infant descendants to A.G. Rizzolis rendition of his mother as a Gothic cathedral, this refreshingly offbeat show of 20th-century self-taught artists covers a vivid range of portraits. (See above.) (Grace Glueck) BROOKLYN MUSEUM: MONETS LONDON: ARTISTS REFLECTIONS ON THE THAMES, 1859-1914, through Sept. 4. This polished and studiously dry show has a dozen of Monets wildly, paradisaically pretty paintings at its center, surrounded by images of London, many of them prints and photographs, by other artists, including James McNeill Whistler and figures now known primarily to art historians. 200 Eastern Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718)638-5000.(Holland Cotter) COOPER-HEWITT NATIONAL DESIGN MUSEUM: EXTREME TEXTILES, through Oct. 30. Dont look for aesthetic pizazz in this intensely tech-y show of industrial fibers and fabrics, but dont rule it out. The shows raison dĂȘtre is solely use, but a lot of whats on view, in the first museum display of material made to function in extreme conditions, is visually exciting. 2 East 91st Street, (212)849-8400. (Glueck) THE FRICK COLLECTION: FROM CALLOT TO GREUZE: FRENCH DRAWINGS FROM WEIMAR, through Aug. 7. This show sprints through French art of the 17th and 18th centuries and reveals it to be a phenomenon of varying moods and accomplishments. The 70 drawings, including some by Claude Lorrain, Watteau and Boucher, from the municipal holdings of the German city of Weimar. And many were acquired by that collections first curator, the great writer, philosopher and lover of all things French, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe; 1 East 70th Street, (212)288-0700. (Cotter) *GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM: ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE AND THE CLASSICAL TRADITION: PHOTOGRAPHS AND MANNERIST PRINTS, through Aug. 24. This exhibition juxtaposes obsessively styled, drunkenly body-oriented art from the late 18th and late 20th centuries, achieving a fairly even rate of exchange in an unusually elegant installation. But the prints, having more to begin with, come out ahead and look remarkably fresh. 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 89th Street, (212)423-3500. (Smith) GUGGENHEIM: OTEIZA: MYTH AND MODERNISM, through Aug. 24. With the goal of paring sculpture down to an emptied (not empty) space that he saw as filled with spiritual energy, the Basque sculptor Jorge Oteiza (1908-2003) worked intensively during the 1950s creating the right containers. Experimenting with a number of different mathematical models, he undertook processes like opening polyhedrons and emptying spheres and cubes, to arrive at a series called Metaphysical Boxes, made from the opposition of two trihedrons. The dark, nearly inaccessible spaces he created here seem to take on a religious character. When at the end of the 1950s he felt he had met his goal, Oteiza turned to Basque political and social causes. But his work, mostly small in scale, smacks too much of theory to be of exciting visual interest. (See above.) (Glueck) *INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY: YOUNG AMERICA, through Sept. 4. The Dauguerreotype, an early version of photography, though invented in Europe, was a huge hit in the United States, and you can see why in these extraordinary pictures of a countrys political and intellectual elite and its well-heeled citizens. Taken by two members of a well-known Boston studio, each picture glows on the wall like a stone in a mood ring, or a computer screen floating in space. At 1133 Avenue of the Americas, at 43rd Street, (212)857-0000. (Cotter) METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART: ALL THE MIGHTY WORLD, through Aug. 21. In one of the mediums shortest great careers, Roger Fenton helped establish photography as both an art and a profession in masterly landscapes, portraits and still lifes that, for all their prescience, also express a profound ambivalence about the very notion of progress. Fifth Avenue and 82nd Street, (212)535-7710. (Smith) *MET: MATISSE: THE FABRIC OF DREAMS -- HIS ART AND HIS TEXTILES, through Sept. 25. This somewhat scattered yet astounding exhibition demonstrates that as African sculptures were to the Cubists, so textiles were to Matisse, and revolutionizes the understanding of both his life and his work. (See above.) (Smith) MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN: DUAL VISION: THE SIMONA AND JEROME CHAZEN COLLECTION, through Sept. 11. A selection of fair-to-good paintings by artists like Hans Hofmann, Richard Pousette-Dart, John McLaughlin and Roy Lichtenstein and a collection of mostly mediocre ceramics and art glass create a disjunctive hybrid of an exhibition. 40 West 53rd Street, (212) 956-3535. (Ken Johnson) MUSEUM OF BIBLICAL ART: COMING HOME!, through July 24. A new small museum devoted to art related to the Bible gets off to a lively start with a big show of artworks by 73 untrained Southern Christian evangelicals. Many names familiar to followers of 20th-century folk and outsider art are on hand, including William Edmondson, the Rev. Howard Finster and Sister Gertrude Morgan. 1865 Broadway, at 61st Street, (212)408-1500. (Johnson) MUSEUM AT FASHION INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY: FABULOUS! FASHIONS OF THE 1940S, through July 30. Constructed around a selection of dresses from the institutes collection, this thought-provoking exhibition briefly tells what happened when the Germans invaded Paris, forcing that city to surrender its role as leader of world fashion to New York City -- at least until the end of the war. Seventh Avenue at 27th Street, (212) 217-7999.(Johnson) *MUSEUM OF MODERN ART: LEE FRIEDLANDER, through Aug. 29. A gigantic retrospective of this great photographer of the American vernacular scene, whose sly and haunting works (grungy cityscapes, wild landscapes, portraits and nudes) can put you in mind of Audens remark that every original genius has something a bit shady about him. In Mr. Friedlanders case, its a compliment. 11 West 53rd Street, (212)708-9400. (Michael Kimmelman) *MUSEUM OF MODERN ART: PIONEERING MODERN PAINTING: CÉZANNE AND PISSARRO, through Sept. 12. The marriage of minds, sensibilities and influences that CĂ©zanne and Pissarro shared is the subject of this rigorous, beautiful show. Unlike its predecessor, Matisse Picasso, it is less a grand opera than a lieder recital of deep-running, summer-green Schubertian pleasures. (See above.) (Cotter) NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN: GEORGE CATLIN AND HIS INDIAN GALLERY, through Sept. 5. The portraits and landscapes here give an account of Plains Indian life in the 1830s in wonderful and sometimes harrowing detail. Viewing it is a remarkable experience. 1 Bowling Green, Lower Manhattan, (212)514-3700. (Glueck) P.S. 1 CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER: GREATER NEW YORK 2005, through Sept. 26. A youth-besotted, cheerful, immodestly ingratiating, finally disappointing survey of contemporary art, perusing a scene whose wide stylistic range, emphasis on drawing, persistent teenage infatuations and overall dexterousness are firmly entrenched characteristics of the marketplace. 22-25 Jackson Avenue, at 46th Avenue, Long Island City, Queens, (718)784-2084. (Kimmelman) UKRAINIAN MUSEUM: ALEXANDER ARCHIPENKO, through Sept. 4. This rare retrospective of work by the Ukrainian-born sculptor opens the handsome, much-expanded new quarters of this museum. The most exciting part is a beautifully illuminated room of Archipenkos most radical pieces that inspired later artists like Henry Moore. 222 East Sixth Street, East Village, (212)228-0110. (Glueck) *WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART: ROBERT SMITHSON, through Oct. 23. Who knows whether Robert Smithson is the most influential American postwar artist, as this show claims. Consisting mostly of drawings, photographs and films (Smithson didnt make that many sculptures, not ones that could fit into a museum, anyway), this is the first full-scale overview of him in the country. It is consequently dry but still compelling testimony to a great exuberance cut drastically short when Smithson died at 35 in a plane crash in 1973. Self-appointed spokesman for earth art, and scavanger of dirt, shells, slag and other materials from the industrial landscape, he helped to shove Minimalism, Conceptualism and Pop in various messy new directions during the 60s and early 70s. Today, in an era of crabbed imagination and short-term profiteering, the sheer chutzpah of an artist like him is instructive. 945 Madison Avenue, at 75th Street, (212)570-3600. (Kimmelman) WHITNEY MUSEUM: BANKS VIOLETTE, through Oct. 2. In this labor-intensive installation, Romanticism, tragic violence and rock n roll are evoked as much by the detailed wall label as by the ghostly beams of a burned-out church made of gleaming salt. (See above.) (Smith) Galleries: 57th Street RALPH BACERRA: OPULENT FIRE Beautiful and technically awe-inspiring new teapots by this Los Angeles-based ceramicist have organically shaped, multi-part bodies cast from tree branches and surfaces richly glazed in fine geometric patterns. Garth Clark, 25 West 56th Street, (due to renovations of the main lobby), (212)246-2205, through Aug. 12.(Johnson) 7/15 GEES BEND QUILTS Quilts made by women of the tiny hamlet of Gees Bend, Ala., have been making the rounds of United States museums since 2002. For those who are still unacquainted with those extraordinary works of folk art that resonate strikingly with Modernist abstraction, this small show is a good introduction. Ameringer Yohe, 20 West 57th Street, (212)445-0051, through July 22.(Johnson) ELIZABETH HEYERT: THE TRAVELERS A touching show of 31 nearly life-size portraits of black people, dressed to the nines but with their eyes closed. They are dead, it turns out, and lying in their coffins. The set and costume designer for their opulent repose is a Harlem mortician named Isaiah Owens, who upholds a fading custom still observed by some blacks, of paying respect to the dead by seeing them off in sartorial splendor. Photographing them, Ms. Heyert came to believe that the portraits were not about death but about peoples lives and their sharing of family, faith, traditions. Once you get over the startle factor, you can appreciate the elegance and restraint of her response to Mr. Owenss vision. Edwynn Houk Gallery, 745 Fifth Avenue at 57th Street, (212)750-7070, through July 23. (Glueck) Galleries: Chelsea AMBREEN BUTT: I NEED A HERO With flair, wit and uncommon craftsmanship, Ms. Butt, a Muslim born in Pakistan but now living in the United States, revives the exquisitely detailed art of Persian and Indian miniature painting to explore modern issues like self-identity, clashes of cultural values, battles of the sexes and other knotty matters. Her stalwart protagonists take the form of a youngish woman and her clones dressed in casual western clothes, who have at on old-fashioned allegorical symbols like demons, dragons and such. Her work is a pungent addition to that of the growing group of artists here who grapple with bicultural identities. Kustera Tilton Gallery, 520 West 21st Street, (212)989-0082. through July 29. (Glueck) ELEVEN NGUYENS AND THE THIRTY YEAR LOSS The independent curator Trong G. Nguyen has conceived a novel and bittersweet way to celebrate the recent anniversary of the surrender of South Vietnam to the communist North on April 30, 1975. He has gathered together works by 11 contemporary artists who all share the name Nguyen, which is pronounced win. He contributes a cake with thick frosting of yellow paint and lettering that reads Happy Birthday War. PH Gallery, 547 West 27th Street, (212)564-4480, through July 29.(Johnson) EVERLAND This enchanting, 11-person show of fantasy landscapes assembled by independent curator David Gibson includes the watercolorist Russell Nachmans contemporary fairy painting; Ruth Waldmans delicately drawn web of mutant organs; confectionery table-top sculptures by Linda Ganjian, Kim Keevers constructed photograph of a scary, murky yellow mountainscape; and Sandra Bermudezs photograph of orchids whose petals turn out to be tiny Vegas showgirls. Annina Nosei, 530 West 22nd Street, (212)741-8695, through July 23. (Johnson) FEAR GEAR The best piece in this mildly political show is Maria Marshalls video The Emperor and His Clothes in which a boy puts on and takes off absurd amounts of clothing while the soundtrack plays layered excerpts from a speech by President Bush. Also: a video of Patty Chang dancing while being splattered by paint; a knotted and suggestively dangling rubber baseball bat by Via Lewandowsky; and a mural of military clothing fragments by Jean Shin. Roebling Hall, 606 West 26th Street, (212)929-8180, through July 30 (Johnson) GOOD VIBRATIONS Op Art lives on in works by 16 artists in this groovy show. It includes eye-buzzing paintings by Julian Stanczak; cosmic dot paintings by Barbara Takenaga; sumptuously blurry stripes by Chris Gallagher; a luminous blue grid by Susie Rosmarin, a psychedelic painting of the word Substance by Bruce Pearson and much more. McKenzie, 511 West 25th Street, Chelsea (212)989-5467, through July 30.(Johnson) GREATER BROOKLYN This survey of small works by 30 emerging artists selected from 400 submissions by two members of the gallerys staff presents a veritable lexicon of current trends, vigorously pursued. CRG Gallery, 535 West 22nd Street, (212) 229-2766 (through July 22) (Smith). HOMOMUSEUM: HEROES AND MONUMENTS With multiculturalist monuments to all kinds of minorities in place, how about a National Gay Hall of Fame, celebrating gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered culture? This group show of 27 artists could have been sharper and more exploratory than it is, but has good work and packs a lot of history. Exit Art, 475 10th Avenue at 36th Street, (212) 966-7745, through July 30. (Cotter) *LIU ZHENG: THE CHINESE Under the influence of Sander, Frank and Arbus, this Chinese photographer set out to document his own society with a focus on the dark and wild side. His pictures of miners, prisoners, strippers, transsexuals, hospital patients and corpses have an almost surrealistic intensity. Yossi Milo, 525 West 25th Street, (212)414-0370, through Aug. 26. (Johnson) *MATTHEW MONAHAN This labyrinthean cabinet of inventively recycled sculptures and drawings rifles through the combined dustbins of history, art and the artists previous efforts to create a knockout first impression that ultimately wears a bit thin. Anton Kern Gallery, 532 West 20th Street, (212)367-9663, through July 29. (Smith) MONOCHROME IMAGE This show of single-color works in two and three dimensions include a mans suit, hat and shoes cast in pink rubber by David Baskin; a life-size giant squid of yellow crocheted yarn by Mary Carlson; an orange sculpture resembling a big clowns smile by John Monti; and a yellow wooden relief like a section of wainscoting by Francis Cape. Elizabeth Harris, 529 West 20th Street, (212)463-9666, through July 22. (Johnson) NICK PAYNE AND DON PORCELLA In Mr. Porcellas comical paintings, images like Sasquatch lounging in a pink recliner by a wilderness lake and a mobile home trailer on fire are embodied in a thick, sensuously waxy medium. Mr. Payne constructs humorously primitive illustrations of probably apocryphal historical events out of colored pipe cleaners. Planaria, 525 West 23rd Street, (212)645-2100, through July 23. (Johnson) RICHARD STIPL: BLOC SABBATH A dark minded humanist and skillful sculptor, Mr. Stipl creates small, creepy, extremely realistic, painted heads of grimacing men with secret society emblems or images of famous women tattooed on their shaved skulls. An ensemble of 10 one-fourth-life-size nude men on a shelf represents a Boschian satanic ritual. Claire Oliver, 513 West 26th Street, (212)929-5949, through July 23. (Johnson) SUMMER SUSTENANCE: A GOURMANDS DELIGHT This visual feast of artworks representing food includes Will Cottons painting of a forest made of chocolate; Katherine Bradfords cartoon painting of a stack of pancakes; Mary Jo Vaths realistic watermelon; a vomit-scape by Cindy Sherman; letters spelling Nice Hot Vegetables by Ed Ruscha; a 1958 drawing of grapes on the vine by Andy Warhol; a 1932 commercial photograph of eggs and an egg slicer by Ansel Adams; and Steve Gianakoss painting of Bad Mom putting a child into an oven. Edward Thorpe, 210 11th Avenue, (212)691-6565, through July 29.(Johnson) Other Galleries ANIMAL TALES This entertaining show presents paintings of all kinds of animals in all kinds of styles: fantasy creatures painted naturalistically, real animals painted surrealistically, cartoon hybrids and old-fashioned allegorical beasts. Participating artists include Catherine Howe, David Humphrey, Elizabeth Huey, James Esber, Anton van Dalen and many more. DFN, 176 Franklin Street, TriBeCa, (212)334-3400, through Sept. 2.(Johnson) JOHN BEECH Mr. Beechs elegant, subtly humorous sculptures conjoin Minimalism and utilitarianism; a tall, aqua-blue box, for example, looks like a container for parts in a factory that Donald Judd might have built. Peter Blum, 99 Wooster Street, SoHo, (212)343-0441, through Sept. 10. (Johnson) ALLAN DESOUZA: THE LOST PICTURES New pictures by this conceptualist photographer meditate on the photograph as a memorial object. Mr. deSouza placed prints made from old family slides around his home, allowing them to become faded and abraded and to accumulate hair, dust and other debris. He then turned them into large, glossy digital prints in which the ghosts of the original images haunt the new, busily textured, semi-abstract surfaces. Talwar, 108 East 16th Street, Union Square, (212) 673-3096, through July 29. (Johnson) *THE GENERALS JAMBOREE: SECOND ANNUAL WATERCOLOR EXHIBITION Watercolor is a chronically underestimated art medium -- paintings poorer, implicitly feminine cousin. This may be one reason so many young artists have embraced it, armed with all kinds of intentions and techniques, including a few pointed at three dimensions, and also why this exhibition is, indeed, an exuberant jamboree. With the vogue for multi-media, it is also clarifying to see more than three score artists concentrating on just one. Guild & Greyshkul, 28 Wooster Street at Grand Street, SoHo, (212)625-9224, through July 30. (Smith) VITALY KOMAR: THREE-DAY WEEKEND The work in Mr. Komars first solo show is more personal and less zanily satirical than the art he produced with his long-time collaborator Alex Melamid, but it does involve ingenious play with political and cultural signifiers. Ronald Feldman, 31 Mercer Street, SoHo, (212)226-3232, through July 29. (Johnson) MAKE IT NOW: NEW SCULPTURE IN NEW YORK This survey of work by nearly 30 young and youngish artists is overly cautious but nonetheless gives an interesting account of the diffuse field of sculpture (which includes photography, video, ceramics and painting in this case); tracks the current cross-fertilization between assemblage and appropriation art and offers enough glimmers of new talent to be worth a visit. Sculpture Center, 41-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, Queens, (718)361-1750, through July 31. (Smith) SYLVIA SLEIGH Ms. Sleigh is best known for the male odalisques she painted in the 1970s. The ones in this seven-decade retrospective are comical and embarrassing but still wonderful documents of first-wave feminism, and so is the large 1977 group portrait of members of the all-female cooperative gallery A.I.R. Newhouse Center for Contemporary Art, Snug Harbor Cultural Center, 1000 Richmond Terrace, Staten Island, (718)448-2500, through Oct. 2. (Johnson) Last Chance EXCEEDING PAINT/EXPANDING PAINTING In conceptual or formal ways, 14 artists subvert traditional painting. Approaches range from mildly rebellious -- as in Arturo Herreras fusion of Abstract Expressionism and Disneyesque cartooning painted on the wall -- to mildly offensive, as in Philippe Mestes semen-splattered mirror. Pratt Manhattan Gallery, 144 West 14th Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 647-7778, closing tomorrow.(Johnson) JOAN MITCHELL SKETCHBOOK: 1949-51 The 60 pages from a single notebook document an eventful period in this American painters life, years that saw her moving between New York and Paris, and changing from a figurative to an abstract painter, consolidating a connection to French modernism, particularly to CĂ©zanne and early Mondrian; and absorbing the spirit of the New York painters she felt closest to, Willem De Kooning, Arshile Gorky. Francis M. Naumann, 22 East 80th Street, Upper East Side, (212)472-6800, closing today.(Cotter) * MOMUS AND MAI UEDA: ILL SPEAK, YOU SING From 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, Momus, the Scottish-born alternative-music legend, makes up stories, while Ms. Ueda, a Japanese performance artist, sings, comments and moves about. Zach Feuer Gallery (LFL), 530 West 24th Street, Chelsea, (212)989-7700, closing today. (Smith) *VISUAL GLOSSOLALIA This unusual show of mediumistic writing -- often imaginary and usually embellished -- includes works by eight mostly American self-taught artists and one extraordinary Burmese yantra book from around 1900. Luise Ross Gallery, 568 Broadway at Prince Street, SoHo, (212)343-2161, closing today. (Smith)

Drew Barrymore Kisses Daughter Frankie in the Cutest.

Drew Barrymore shared a rare photo kissing her cute daughter Frankie for a special Valentines Day promotion -- see the sweet pic!




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